What Are You Watching?

78: Quentin Tarantino

November 23, 2022 Alex Withrow & Nick Dostal
What Are You Watching?
78: Quentin Tarantino
Show Notes Transcript

It’s finally here, our full career breakdown of the one, the only, Quentin Tarantino. As Alex and Nick review every movie in Tarantino’s filmography, stray topics include favorite characters, best music moments, loudest controversies, the films that influenced Tarantino, and so much more!
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Watch Alex's films at http://alexwithrow.com/
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Hey, everyone, welcome to. What are you watching? I'm Alex, Switzerland. I'm joined by my best man, Nick Dostal. How are you doing there, Gimp? What? That's the one. That's the one I of all of them. Oh, my God, you son of a bitch! I'm thinking. They're so. Big. I had so many good. Alliteration. In their Daisy Dog Review. Winston Wolf had so many to go with. I can't believe you. Are. I? That is that again. That's fucking ridiculous. All right, fine. One of my favorite characters for you. Excited? I'm very. Excited. I'm excited to be here. I have to. I have to. This one's a big one. This is one we've been talking about from the beginning, from in the two. Years we were planning to start this podcast. We're like, when is it going to happen? When are we fitting them in? And now it's here and. It's a director profile. It's going to be really straightforward. We're going to. Talk about the man a little bit. But moreover, we are. Here to talk about these. I don't know, is it nine or is it ten films? He would say it's nine, obviously, because he says he has one to go. He counts the kill bills as one film. But however way you look at it, this is one of my all time. Favorite directors and rewatching. All of his movies. Like two or three. Times since July, which is what I've done, you see him. Grow. And you see all this mad. Crazy. Movie buff use this mass skill that he has. Acquired. And make continue to make this. Amazing art. So I don't have much in the way of an. Introduction for charity. I'm not going to describe like where he's from or any of that. It's just. We're. Here. Let's get into it. How you feel it. I guess I want to start with this idea that that I feel like we should talk about to begin it where I love Quentin Tarantino. But do you think when Tarantino's a rip off. Oh, god. I didn't know you're coming with that heat right. Away, because I. Feel like this is a good time to talk about this. Is Jesus Christ, man. This is like if you want to do this. First, over here, over. Everything you want to do, rip off over violence, impact on violence, the impact his screenplays have had on film, how they've changed, how Pulp Fiction may be. The most influential movie that's been made since. It was released. You're just trying to fucking rile me up. 30 minutes, three, three, the third. Minute rip off. I like to equate it to hip. Hop and rap a. Little bit since that music. Has been created. It's all a sample based. Art form and you. Can still. Hear great hip. It's not. Just for hip hop and rap. Obviously, but you can still. Hear amazing songs from that genre. And then you got some. Cool person over there, and now we have the Internet. But back in the day it'd be like, No, listen to this track from the seventies. This is what? Whatever, Puff Daddy, what big ear sampling to put on their stuff. And if you take enough of those samples, you can still have. Your own. DNA. Like, maybe. Your lyrics are your own. Your producer is in there. Mixing it up a little bit, but no one can deny that. Part of the. DNA. Of your work. Is based on the. Work of other artists. And that is. Very, very clear when we are talking about Terrence Haenow. Now, I don't think this is. True, particularly. Of the last few films he's made. I think he's really there are always influences. I can see. Of other movies on his work. But I don't. I think especially once upon a time in Hollywood is a movie that is influenced by so much, but he's not like there's no 1 to 1. Comparison with any other movie. It's like he's really. Stepping into no. Now I've made a. Quentin Tarantino. Film, which he has since 1992. That's not what I'm saying. But for a lot of these early movies, Reservoir Dogs, there are. Comps. That are very, very fucking similar, like. Wholesale deals scenes that he is. Taken from. Hong Kong, movies from Japanese movies. From. Italian. Horror. Films. From spaghetti westerns. And he is putting them. Throughout his work in a. Way that honestly, I have this. Is part of my Reservoir Dogs notes. That I think he was kind of lucky to get away with at the time because the Internet wasn't a thing. When we jump 20 years. Later to. Django now he knows, Oh, I can't just like. Rip off. This spaghetti western from 1966. I have to like let it be known that I am paying stark homage to this movie. The Django Font in the in the beginning of his film is the exact same font as Django the movie. I know this because I just. Watch it for the first time yesterday. And that's why Tarantino's unchained is like in that white font. Yeah, the song that's. Playing during the credits. Is the exact same song. Like It's There. The actor, you know. Django, the guy who goes, Do you know how to spell it? Like that's the original actor. So there that. Is homology. Margin is very, very clearly. Like this is like an homage to Django. Whereas in Reservoir Dogs with certain movies. City. On Fire is a. Movie that came out in Hong Kong five years. Before. In 1987. And when I tell you it's how identical its final scene. Is to Reservoir Dogs. It's genuinely. Startling. It's something that you couldn't do anymore. You couldn't we couldn't have. It would be very difficult. Nowadays. For a foreign movie to. Come out and then. A new American director just. Like take that scene and. Not really go around publicly. Giving it. Credit. Yeah, that's. Kind of a long rant that I. Didn't expect to go on. It's it's an interesting argument to have. It's an interesting conversation to have because, yeah, I hear you. But what he's doing is it's not like he remade City on Fire. There's a lot of it that doesn't have anything to. Do with the Reservoir Dogs. But yeah, there's something I'm going to point out about Pulp Fiction. That I never realized. That a. Very, very significant. Line from that movie he just. Plucked from a. Completely. Separate. Movie 21. Years earlier. That he is clearly tying into Pulp Fiction. So I don't know. I don't know how much we want to say, like, is he a thief? Is it a homage? Because he's always been. Very. Quick to give. Credit. To certain. Movies. He just wrote a book. That I just finished Cinema Speculation that. Is largely. About this, about how his favorite movies from the sixties and seventies have influenced his. Work. But I don't know. If that's your only argument. Against him. That's I can we can. Go round and round. I'll put it that way. You and I are going to go round the round. The reason I bring it up, I feel like it was a good way to talk about it just to start. It is because I feel like that is his biggest well, one of the biggest criticisms that he gets out of all the filmmakers that I can think of that I know and I'm including Scorsese in this conversation, too, I think Quentin Tarantino might be cinema's biggest fan when he makes his movies. He is just the biggest fan of everything that he's putting into his movies, but he's doing it in a very, very way that it feels like Quentin Tarantino, even if they are straight up, takes from things. Yeah, all. Of these iconic movies and moments that we're going to talk about are so specifically him. Yeah, they are. I love that. Actually, it's one of my favorite things about Quentin Tarantino is to when you watch the Quinn Tarantino movie, you're also watching a bit of history. Yes. So I thought that was a good way to start. I'm glad you thought so. But it does lead to a thing I. Was going to bring up later. But this. Notion of. History. Because when he was doing this and when in. Every interview. He it's not like he's hiding about it. He was talking about. Yes, this was. From this movie. This is from this. When I got linked up to. Tarantino's. Vibe and to his films as. A very, very. Young boy. I was ten years old when I saw Pulp Fiction. That was my first I became, when I tell you how obsessed I became with tracking down. Every movie, referenced just everything. In his movies, and this is. pre-Internet. So I'm like. That's just what it was. I would go. Back and try to find everything and go. Oh, I see. I see where he's grabbing that. I see where he's grabbing that. If people go listen to our Goodfellas podcast, I spent a lot of time talking about the. Similarities of Jules and Jim Francois to. Jules and Jim to Goodfellas, and I swear to God, if you love Goodfellas and you have a committed. To memory, if. You just go. Watch the first five. Minutes of Jules and Jim. You're going to. Go, Oh, Scorsese, you just like, stole that, like, wholesale. Yeah. People have always been doing this. As to your point. Of cinema's biggest fan. Yeah, he's certainly one. Of its most vocal and adamant. What I really. Mind is. When a director does. Stuff like that, pays homage. And they are trying to pretend like it's the first time they've ever done it. That's the difference. But you would. Say, all right, we're going to get focus back here to Tarantino. You would say that he's like one of your. Top ten directors. 100. I mean, is that even like debatable for us? Yeah, I'm just basing that on the dude's made. We'll call it nine. The dude's made nine or ten films and I would give them all. Extremely high grades. I don't dislike any of them. Yeah, we are just going. To dove right. In. We have some fun things planned. We're going to go through the whole filmography. We have some fun. Categories for. Each movie. We're going to end. With a lot of Oscar talk. I'm going to do some fun. Tarantino. By the. Numbers, so. It's going to be a fun day, but that's enough preamble. You want to. We have a lot to talk about. So would you like to jump right in? I would like to. I would like that very much. We're going to start with a few pre-rolls today. And these are the movies. That Tarantino has. Been involved with. From one degree or another, but he did not direct them. And I know this goes a little out. Of order, but that's okay. We're just getting this work. Out of the way because all of this is genuinely. Fun work to. Talk about. Number one, first up, his first sold screenplay, True. Romance, 19. 93. First, it's. Ridiculous. He debated. Either selling this or Reservoir Dogs. To Tony Scott, which obviously begs the question, what in the. World. Does a Tony. Scott reservoir Dogs. Movie look like? I mean, we're totally. In there for that robbery. Michael Madsen is just kill. And everybody like. It. Yeah, it's just a lot of fun. To go down that road, you. Know? Yeah, that's all. Reservoir Dogs. And True Romance make a great double feature because. Both. Scripts were written. By a movie obsessed madman who was making minimum wage at a video store like this. Dude was not just like living off the fat of the land. Like, he's he's huffing it it. Manhattan Beach there, you know, reservoir Dogs. Was 1.2 million. Dollar movie from a first time director starring. A. Solid group of actors who were all. Just on. The edge from breaking really big other than Harvey. Keitel, who he was the one who, like, actually needed a hit. And then True Romance. Was the sixth film. From a very popular director. Tony Scott. And he gets $12.5 million to make it. And the movie is packed with bona fide stars. More locations. Hans Zimmer Music. I'm just bringing I'm just illustrating all this because it's. Interesting to watch them as a. Double feature and go. They were both written by the. Same guy like back to back with a guy like living in squalor essentially. And it's interesting to see what a. Little more money and a more experienced director can do with his material. And, you. Know, we're just talking about true romance right now. And this is. Like one of the most. Entertaining films I've ever seen. It has been my. Favorite, Tony. Scott. I love this movie. Oh, it's a perfect movie. It's a really good friend of mine. This is his favorite movie. So I always kind of like thinking about this movie when I think when I hear that it's someone's favorite, I think if you had to make that choice, like if Quentin Tarantino, you know, and obviously had like the the foresight to kind of see it, I've got these two movies. One of them I can make one of them I need to sell. Which one do I make? Which one do I sell? I think this was the right call. Yeah, so it was the right call. And but it's really great to see when you watch True Romance Quentin Tarantino's writing and the way that the characters speak, it feels like a Quentin movie. Yep, it really does. And, you know. Scott really. Gets that. Rhythm and. Lets them keep it, which is great. And we could do a whole True Romance. Podcast like the original script. His original script was Out of order. And Tony Scott put. It in order. So again, there's just. All these. Roads to. Go down, but want to call that one out? That's I still can't believe that. That was his first sold script. And another cool reason to bring these. Movies up is that Quentin Tarantino does. Not do director commentaries for his. Own movies, but he does do. One for true romance. And one a. Little later that we're talking. About. And it. Is a great. Listen. So I would. Highly recommend. That. That was a pretty. Amicable. Experience. Now we're going to go the next year to Natural Born Killers, which all but ruined Tarantino's life. According to him. This is his second script that he sold. Tarantino tried to. Make it himself. For about half million dollars, but he. Couldn't. So he sold it to producers for ten grand. Oh, ouch. I mean, just knowing what it would become, I mean, he did not. He sold true romance for, like. Not a lot of money at all. He's not making I mean, ten grand when and, you know, 1991, when you're making minimum wage, it's like a fortune. I get it. But still, just putting this all into context. But and then eventually, if you've. Seen Natural Born Killers, Tarantino only has a story credit. On. Oliver Stone's. Film. Tarantino is not a fan of this movie. Oliver Stone. Changed a lot. Due to script. It's just it's it's very different. I've read it. Actually, and it's so funny. Because the producers tried. To stop. Him from releasing his script, his original script and paperback after Natural Born Killers was already released. Saying. It was like copyright infringement. But there was a lawsuit. And eventually he was he was allowed. To release his original screenplay, which is how I read it. I like Natural Born Killers. The script is a very, very fun read. It's just a. It's a weird movie. It's a very, very out there movie. It's it is an. Oliver Stone. Movie, not a. Tarantino movie, for sure. How how much is the script different? Well, the I can't get into that without revealing the end, but the end is completely different. And Tarantino. Thought that just missed. The mark. Entirely and missed the intention of what the movie is about. Tarantino's script is much more. About the two main. Characters, Mickey and Mallory. Woody Harrelson. Eventually played by Woody Harrelson and Juliette Lewis and Stone's movie just goes off on. Some very, very crazy directions. And it's not as contained. Like, this is when. Stone was crazy. This is like JFK is like a fucking. Crazy. Movie. It's it won Oscars. Good on it. But Natural Born Killers. Is. Just, like, really, really. Savage and nuts. And I don't know when you get. When you're. Watching it, you get to the end. There's really. Nothing about it that to me feels Tarantino ish. Other than I've heard him for my. Entire life, talk about these Mickey and. Mallory characters who were, you. Know, just this. These love crazy killers driving across the country, killing people. That's that was originally. What he wanted it to be. But, you know, when he could not make. It for his. Half million dollars, he that's what you do when. You're a struggling. Screenwriter in Hollywood. You sell something. For ten grand and. Go, adios. I mean, at least it got made. I don't know. That's I don't know. Yeah. Yeah, that's true. For rooms released. In 1995, an anthology film that he was involved with. In part with his. Good buddy that he had met at the festival. Circuit. Robert Rodriguez. Tarantino's section is the last one, the man from Hollywood. Okay. So the cool thing about. Four rooms that I. Didn't know specifically the man from Hollywood sequence. That Tarantino Snow writes, directs and stars in. Much to the. Chagrin of a. Few people. I'm sure this is adapted. From a Roald. Dahl. Story. Called Man from the South, and this was. Actually already. Adapted into TV twice. First in 19. 64, Alfred Hitchcock Presents for an episode of that starring Steve. McQueen and. Peter Laurie. Wow. Yeah, isn't that cool? And I found. It interesting that for whatever reason, Tarantino and Bruce Willis. In. Their. Skit. The Man from Hollywood, they keep referring to man from the. South as. Man from Rio. I don't know why. I don't know. Because it's called man from the South. And I looked I double checked it, I guess. I guess the idea is that they're so. Wasted in their four room. Sketch that. They got it wrong. Anyway. Also, this. Story was. Remade in a 1985 episode. Of Alfred Hitchcock Presents Star. And get. This Steven Bauer, his then wife, Melanie. Griffith. Her mom, Tippi Hedren, Kim Novak and John Huston. I guess it's done. It's like it's still I was like, what do I do? Fight it on YouTube? But I would I have to watch it. So it was. A really. Fun way to spend an hour. I watched the Steve McQueen one. I watched the John Houston one, and then I. Watched the Tarantino. One. The Tarantino version is very different from the. Others, I'll put it that way. It was just a fun way to spend 60 minutes. I don't know that that was part of the joy. Of this Tarantino. Podcast to me is that not. Only did I rewatch. His films, I watched as. We referenced early on. As many movies as possible that have inspired him to make these specific films. Like Probably I did. Seven or eight movies for each of his. Movies that I watched rewatched some of them I had seen. But I advise people I encourage people to go check that out on YouTube. Man from the South. I love. That. That's that that speaks to exactly who he is. Like he's like, all right, I'm going to be involved with this project with my buddy. I'm just going to do like a short segment out of like one of these four scenes. What do I want to do? Oh, man. There's this story that, like, started here. They did a version of it here, did a version of it here. I'll just do a version of it. Oh, the story's so simple. It's. It's this guy. An older gambler, and each version. Will go up to a guy and basically say, if you can. Light your lighter ten times in a row. Then I'll give you. A car, or I will. Give you money if you fail to light it. Just once I get. To chop your pinky finger off. That's it. There's your setup. So, yeah, it's good and all of it's just fun. Now we're going to move on to. My favorite movie to. Hang out too, in this pre-roll. Section. Here. If you listen to our Episode 30 favorite hangout movies, that is from Dusk Till Dawn Woo from 1996, I love everything about this easily. One of the funniest movies I've ever seen just. For Michael Parks's. Opening 10 minutes alone. I mean, I think I'm going to get tanked tonight. Oh, my God. Tonight? I don't know. The whole thing. Was just marketed. As this. Brother's on the run crime thriller from the. Guys who. Made Reservoir Dogs Desperado, Pulp. Fiction say. No more like. I was. I rented it the first night. It was available when I was ten and I. Never saw. Coming what happens and I forgot. It's like it's a good hour in. It's almost an hour in when it happens. And I remember showing this. To Allie and she was like, What the fuck is. Going on right now? Like I thought, this is like a. A gangster hiding. Out movie and it still works. I don't know. So I just love what movies. Like Grindhouse Drive in. Movies, they have the leeway to kind of take that. Hard of a. Pivot. And I don't think this. Movie's ever got enough credit for that. Because I love it. I just love it. If you really want to. We deep dove into this movie on our our favorite hangout movie episode if you get what I just said here. Yeah, I know. But I'm saying it again because you said it's your favorite movie to hang out too. You didn't see it was on our hangout episode. Ding, ding, ding. I'm everyone. Go back to this and play the tape back because that's exactly what I said. You said it's your favorite movie to hang out, too. As we said in episode. 30, our favorite hangout. Movies episode. That's exactly what I said. Oh, roll. Your eyes on me. God dammit, buddy. I'm going to shoot you in the face. All right, all right. Time out. Fine. Moving on. I was trying to be. A go podcast host. We did? Yes, we did have a fun. Time right before we recorded that episode watching this movie together. And I think I mean, we talk about movies that make me laugh like. What's what are funny. Ones? Because I have. A weird sense of humor. This is right up there. I think. This movie is. Hysterical. But also also knows how to get. Really creepy and like really gross. With that. Juliette Lewis Oh, yeah. Tarantino dynamic. This is also. Another commentary that he does with Rodriguez, and it is a great. Listen. I learned so. Much about the movie. I listened. To it years ago, but. Listening to it with this. Commentary on, Oh my God, it's perfect. Perfect. I think that's the best acting that Quentin Tarantino's ever done. Yeah, it is. That's that's important to bring up. It is. It is he he he puts himself in a lot of movies and it's it's questionable. But I think this one I think it works. Yeah. I mean, it's fair. That's the the paying homage stuff. The we're going to talk about this the some of the use of. One word in particular, but some of the. Language in his movies, the fact that he puts himself in his own movies a. Lot. Yeah. These are all things that are pretty hard to argue against. It's like I have. Never, ever. Had as much. Of a problem with his. Acting as like a lot. Of other. People seem to have. I think he very. Intentionally. I've just never had as big of a problem with it. But a lot of people do. But I do. Think his role in From Dusk. Till Dawn is the best acting he's done. I mean. He really. Feels like a. Genuine creep. And when you listen to that. Commentary. He was taking his. Acting work like really, really seriously and really. Wanted to commit to it and talk. He was talking. About trying to get. Into the mind of this just complete. And utter nutcase. By not playing him nuts because he doesn't know he's nuts, which is always, you know. Yeah. Listen to one thing I want to say about this that I just never knew. And this was so cool to me. Obviously, Tarantino was writing a lot of scripts at the time. That he just like had in the bank. Reservoir Dogs. Pulp Fiction From Dusk till Dawn. True Romance, Natural Born. Killers. He like has all these and he was he would reuse some stuff sometimes kind of thinking like, well, this. Movie's never going to get made. So I may as well put them all in there. The first. Time he ever wrote. The Ezekiel 2517 speech was for the scene. When Harvey Keitel. Is walking down the hallway trying to, you know, avoid the beast with like the shotgun and the bat. And he makes that so cross. He was originally. Supposed to say Ezekiel 25, 17. And Robert Rodriguez said. That was one of the main reasons he. Agreed to direct the. Movie because he loved that speech so much. Then Pulp Fiction gets made. We all know what Samuel Jackson does with it, but I just I got a huge kick out of that. That's cool. As a good as a good little tidbit. Yeah. Sin City 2005. Directed by his buddy. Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller. It was kind of well-known that they. Let Tarantino come in and direct. Benicio Del. Toro, Clive Owen car scene. When Benicio has like his, you know. Throat. Slash head. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Nobody ever really quits. The making of. Documentary for this is really. Cool because this is, to my knowledge, the first and only time. Tarantino's ever used digital cameras and digital photography. And you. Can. You can see him. Responding to it in real. Time being like, Oh, my God, yeah, it's so easy. Like, your setups are easier, your lighting's easier. Like, I see how this. Could be very useful. I'm never going. To fucking make a movie with this, but I get it. I get it. You know, he's Tarantino's one of our last hard, fast shoot on film. Only directors. But. That's our last pre-roll. Just wanted to call that out. We're going to. Move on to the big. Hitters here. But any sense, any thoughts? I just remember that whole entire movie was just it was just really cool. And I remember that scene in particular having it felt like we were because we were in that story. But then that scene comes, right? And it felt different. It felt like it felt like someone else took over. And just for this little tiny moment and both those actors, I would love to see both Benicio and Clive Owen in a Quentin Tarantino movie. Cut, so die, so die. They would they would kill it. Well, we're going to. Get to that, you know, in in a. Few hours, you know. Whatever when it gets, they're going to talk about what we think he could. Do for his last. Movie. Not that we have any insight at all. It's just going to be a fun convo. But now we're going to move on to the big hitters. It's 1992. He gets $1.2 million to make this movie. Called Reservoir. Dogs. He cast the ever. Loving. Shit out of it. Where to begin? Here's what I want to say. Think of all the debut films you have seen. From a director. And now think of all the debut films you've. Seen from a writer director. None of those. None of those movies begin with. That writer director. Monologuing at a table with. Actors who are way more famous. Than him. And he's monologue being about a madonna pop song, no less. I genuinely cannot emphasize how. Important. The beginning of this movie is. It is literally Quentin Tarantino. Announcing that This is my movie, this is my voice, it is. Weird. New and. Here. To stay. It's just crazy. Like when. You listen past the dialog, past the crassness, the non-PC language, when you consider the intention of all this, the intention of. Having the writer director. Completely own. The first few. Minutes of his movie, of. His first movie. And then. Kind of recede into the. Background because he's he's like a sea level. Character for the rest. Of the movie. It's just. Oh yeah, to. Own the. Very. Beginning, Oh, this is on purpose. This is not just someone who thinks. They've written a really. Funny monologue about Madonna. This is the fact that he gave those lines to himself. It's really, really startling. To watch now. And I watch that and go, he's literally going like, How's it going? There's a new kid in town, Jack. I love it. I love. It. The confidence of this movie is just off the charts. Yeah, I can only imagine being an audience member in 1992 and being like, Have you ever seen anything like this? Have you ever started a movie with a table full of people where the talk that's being heard is about absolutely nothing. Nothing that. Will ever come back in a play? Like, I mean, the, you know. Super sounds of the. Seventies will come back up. But like, yes, this has nothing to. Do with the story at. All with the plot. None it nothing at all. But what is happening is by way of this very, very fresh and captivating dialog that we've never heard from anyone, we are getting to know these characters a little bit. You know, you only have a certain time period to get to know these people. I think a good way to get to know characters is shit like this. It's it's stuff that has nothing to do with what they're going to be doing in the plot of the movie. It's points of view, it's opinions. It's just little side jabs to each other. I love that you're right. Like this is him coming out and saying that this is I'm here to stay. My biggest thing when I. Think of Reservoir Dogs is. Pulp Fiction did come. First. I saw that. And then immediately, like the next. Week, rented Reservoir Dogs and started. Picking that one apart. It was the the economy of dialog. In Reservoir. Dogs is something it still gives me chills to just think about it. And I definitely I noticed that in Pulp Fiction, but. In Reservoir. Dogs, even when I watch it now, when Steve Buscemi. Is trying to break up that. Fight and he goes, Fuck sides, man, what we need here is a little. Solid. Darity Yeah. I. Never heard like. I knew, I knew what the game. Solitaire was. And I thought it was called that because you played it alone. I don't know if I knew what the word solitude was, but I. Had never is. Is such like. A weird micro thing to bring. Up. But I just. Never heard like a word used in a different. Way that I knew it could be used. And I knew from the way it was used what solidarity meant, even though I didn't know the definition. Of that word. But I was like. Oh, I know what they mean. And he wants them all to, like. Be together and. Like, be. Yeah, they all need to get together. It was. It was like literally making me a better writer. Like the way. You become. A better writer if you read a lot. Just by watching. So I was like, Oh, I didn't even know people, like, talk to each other this way. This shit's crazy. And that was what was blowing my mind the most when I was 1011. It was not the excessive language, which this is one of his most. Curse filled. Movies. It was not the violence. And that's what and that's what my. Parents. Identified within me, like. Really, really young. That I would kind of pop up and like right down these lines. Like, what. We need here is a little solidarity. I wasn't like glorifying the violence. I thought that was never the thing for me. I was really getting. In there just. To the writing. I couldn't. Remember if I'd ever. Seen a movie. I mean, Jesus Christ, you're just in a scene. And then it cuts to like oak wood paneling, like a low shot of it, and you're like, The fuck is going on? And then this dude, Mr. White, like, walks. Into frame and this red polo, and you're like. Where am I? And he's talking to someone off screen. And then it just cuts to a title card. It says, Mr. White, I don't know if I'd ever seen. That like in a movie. I mean, stuff like that was in Pulp Fiction, but the way this was set up, it was just it was so, so fresh. And I'm not suggesting that. Was never in. A movie. Before. That's not what I'm saying. I'm saying to me at the time, having gone back, of course, he's like he's paying homage, as we're saying. But it it was it was so explosive in any. Number of ways. And I, I do think it's cool that the thing that I found most explosive back then, even as a young kid. Was not the crassness or the violence. It was just the economy of language in the economy, of storytelling. Of course, never showing. The fucking heist. It's like, how do you possibly know that? And it. Works. So well. It's a marvelous feat. It really is. And it's not like he had a choice. He didn't have the money to shoot it. He would have never had it. To be able to film it. So yeah. It's the biggest writing rule is to never explain a giant. Giant like it's the whole plot of the movie is this heist I remember. I'm sorry. I'm too. I'm fucking going in. I'm sorry. Yeah. Just real quick. Real quick. When pink and. White are. Talking and they're smoking and they you, that's when they. First start talking. About all that carnage. Blond did. I'm like, Holy shit, they're going to show us this. This is going to be. Yeah, you know, how young do you think that black girl was? Like, this is going to be awful? And then they don't and you don't even you never feel unsatisfied. By the end of this, you're like, Fuck, that was awesome. And you kind of forget that they didn't show the heist, and you're like, Oh yeah, I will shut up now. Please keep going. I just think it's amazing that through exposition, he found a way to convey all the information that we need from what happened at that heist. But in conjunction with dialog between the characters where it made sense, get across the information, get across who's dead, get across what happened, get across different points of view of that. Because he talks about that. He's like, I saw him do this. I didn't see that. I saw that he. That's that's the fucking. Thing right there because. We do this, you know, talk but don't see this happens a lot in movies as. It relates. To. Monologues because you're just like. On the face. And yeah. You're going to hear the person. Saying the thing once and we don't. See it because we're just on. Them. Rarely is it something that. Everyone. In the movie is talking about constantly, like they were done. But I told them not to do like. Everyone's. Talking about it and you. Still never see it and it never, never matters. It's incredible. Never. It's. It's insane. I have a DVD. I'm going to quote a it's the best summation. I was wondering when I was going to get this in here. But it because it's the Reservoir Dogs DVD, it's got to be for the Reservoir Dogs are subject now. They don't see his name in the in the special features. And I'm trying to give credit to this man who basically summed up why Quentin Tarantino's dialog is so good. The poetry of his dialog is an understanding that there is a pentameter to the way that we speak when we are excited and passionate about something. That is what he infuses to all of his characters, and that's why he can make dinner, dining room, table stuff, pop. He can talk about Madonna. He can talk about everything that he talks about is because when we do talk passionately, people listen. We can be talking about anything. No one gives a shit. But if we're, like, alive and we're glowing and we're talking about it, we're listening and he just has all of his characters live in that. Like, in that space. Yeah, I just thought that was just a a perfect summation for why his dialog works the way it does with his characters. Yes, very well said. By that person. And it's like. Hard to we could literally go through. All of these movies and just talk about the scripts. And I almost fear that's the only thing we've done. For Reservoir Dogs so far. But like even in so many of these sequences, like in that sequence when Buscemi and Keitel are talking in that. Backroom. It's like, oh, one shot. Yeah, so many long just. Wonders in the. Movie. The whole. Torture of. The police officer, like a lot of that is in one shot and it's so, so impressively done. And of course all the. Actors are. Completely. On board and they. All sell it. It sounds. Like Lawrence Turner, who played. Joe like he was. Everyone's having a tough time with him. I get it. Like, it's it's all good, but it's so you could see, like, playing off that animosity. Like, apparently he was pissed. During the when you're. Assigning everyone the name like you could see like yo carry it on the fucking riled up pissed off I think he even like. Drops. A line that's a lot of movies that have good scripts in there. It's like all. All the core of it was there, but they. Don't. You know, their screenplay. Movies. They weren't really that well made. They were well acted. But we're. Not talking about the. Cinematography. The music choice and how strong music choices like Jesus. There's so many different aspects. Of Reservoir Dogs or. All of these movies to hone in on. And I thought for each movie as a way to try. To bring up. Some and just like. Diversify the conversation. A little. Bit, we're going to we're going to end each movie with three categories. And I told you, this is dealer's choice. It's I don't care how. Obvious they are, I. Don't care how obscure they are. You can come up with one with two choices. We're going to start here with our first category for Reservoir Dogs. I love basic. I love this. I do two. Pretty. Basic. Give me your. Favorite character and. Why. This one was one of the hardest ones. It really was. Yeah. I'm going with Harvey Keitel as Mr. White. Wow. Awesome, awesome. Yeah. That he shoulders the weight of everything. I think his energy level that he has, like I think in a lot of those scenes that we're talking about where this exposition is happening, wherever the emotional thermometer is of Harvey Keitel is where we are as an audience. Yeah. If he is flipping out and screaming and angry, we need to be angry. If he's, you know, combing his hair, talking to Mr. Pink, you know, trying to be rational about things. That's where we're at. I think he carries that beautifully. And I love that, like you said earlier, like he needed a hit here. Like this is a movie where he was the biggest star. And it was for sure. And he was willing to work with this video store clerk. Right. And no idea, like the gamble he took on this, but ends up being like one of Quint in my opinion. I think Harvey Keitel is one of the best used actors in Quentin Tarantino stuff. Yeah, we'll talk about this wish. Yeah, it makes me wish he was in like as much as Samuel Jackson was. But I get it. Scheduling. Yeah, a. Number of things. But even in from dusk till dawn, like I don't even fucking know. Yeah that was exactly or Winston. Wolf the first time I watched. From dusk till dawn because that damn beard, like I had no idea. I was like, Oh, wow, that's, you know, and 92 we just talked. About this was a great year for. Keitel because he also had Bad Lieutenant, which kind of both of these movies. Really helped surge him. Again back to yeah just the status that he. Deserved. My favorite character. Alone at last. Mr. Blond. Played by Michael Madsen. Yeah, mine's a tie, honestly, because I love. Him for his smooth delivery, and. I love that it is not easy to play a psychopath on. Screen. Yet. I think to go to way that people do that is just to go to take it to 110 and just be, you know, nuts and and. All this frantic stuff. This is one of the most convincing. Portrayals of. A genuine sociopath, psychopath. Whatever murderous. Lunatic. That I've ever seen, because he really, really seems to relish. Just carnage and, like, it's what he. Lives. Yeah, it really makes you wonder. Just what the hell. His prison life was like. If he loves torture, there, if he loves torture this much. He's my yang. And then my yang is Mr. Pink by Steve Buscemi because I like his. Frantic delivery, even. Though he's the only. Real professional. He's the only one whose name we don't learn. The only one. Yeah, I love. Every character in this. You know, even that that cop that. I alluded to earlier. Buddy, I'm going to shoot you in the face so much. Yeah, maybe. Yeah, yeah. Also, I love the. You know, how much he put into Tim Roth like that was a big gamble because he he'd. Been around. But it wasn't like it's a huge. Role to. Put on someone and talking about how difficult it is to play a convincing, tough guy. Pretty difficult to play. Someone for an entire movie. Who's been fucking shot stomach and like has. To carry that. Yeah. And he. Really, really. Plays that well when that's just like a young. Actor. Sitting in, like, sticky fake blood like that, you know, a dude's not actually shot, but you actually feel like your shot. So props to him, of course. There's one thing that I just want to talk about as we go on through all of his movies, because he uses it differently in every single one. Blood. Oh, the way. Blood looks in Quentin Tarantino's movies is different in almost every single one. And I and I know that's a choice, maybe not at this point, because he probably just was like, We just need whatever we can get. But the way he uses blood and how he always likes to say that it's red eye, it's one thing I just want to always check in. I think it's cool. This is. Very. Practical blood. Like when zoom in, when he's like undoing his belt, when white is on doing oranges and you just zoom in on it like. It's really practical. Use of blood and like how much blood is coming out of that? Out of that belly? Oh, yes. Some stuff like some of the blood used in Kill Bill and Django was. Very over-the-top, on purpose. And designed to be. Yes, on purpose. Yes. Homage to those movies. But second category for Reservoir Dogs favorite needle drop. This is Anytime a song comes on. What's your favorite. Set piece sequence that has a song. I will never, ever forget. Seeing this opening credits sequence and when. Little green bag. I never heard. That song like I just want to shout that out. That's not my choice. It's pretty. My number one choice is pretty inarguable, but yeah. Little green bag. Just seeing them in that slow motion. It doesn't. It wasn't shot in slow motion. I don't believe they did do that in editing, which is why it looks like choppy and not smooth and absolutely perfect. It's been ripped off. So many times. Very blatantly on purpose and things like swingers. But I mean, cut. People just have done that all the time. But then, I mean, yet number one is stuck in the middle with you. Like, it just has to be. Yeah, it just has to be. I remember watching that as a kid and not knowing what was going to happen and just that song comes on. And I just remember there was like a part of me as a kid that was terrified. But then being like, This is awesome. Like, Oh my God. This is fucking cool. But the reason why we're throwing this category into these is because I am of the opinion that no one uses soundtrack music better in all of cinema than Quentin Tarantino. Yeah, he he sets it up the best, and he takes a. Very, very. Long time to pick out his music. From his own personal record collection. He just walks around, he's like, Oh. I could put that here. Yeah. Because a lot of the choices for my music selections are because these are songs that once you see or hear this song in this movie, you don't think of this song on its own anymore. Yeah, it will always be the imagery of how he used it in his movies, and that's an incredible compliment. That's insane. Yeah, we've talked about this. Like, I. Used to write about. This on my blog a lot. Songs that should just. Be retired from movies. Like. Yeah, my favorite part of that entire scene, though, right, is. The song begins to play like right as it starts. You see Madsen do this sort of like he takes a beat and it's a little. Nod of recognition. Like, Wow, I haven't heard this song in 20 fucking years. This song's great. Like, he's really. Happy that the song. Is started and. Like, this is what he's going to be able. To perform. Is chaos to Oh my God, it's just it's. Great. I also want to say that the ear cutting scene. Right there that people lost their minds over is. He took. That directly from another movie that we're going to get. To on down the line. That was way worse in that movie. But anyway. Okay, so. Separate from favorite needle drop, which is like our favorite. Song moment, now we just go. To favorite scene. Slash set piece that no music is playing. During. It can be this is. A broad category. It can be. Anything. I'm going to go first. My favorite thing in Reservoir. Dogs is white versus pink. Some fellers are lucky and some ain't leading to white. First blond. You got a bark all day, little doggy. Are you going to bite? Yeah. Leading to Mr. Pink, splitting them up. Fuck sides. What we need here is a little solidarity. To Mr. Blond, throwing it all away and going, pet your big Lee. Marvin fan art. You like eight you better. Believe. The ten. 11 year old me when I heard that like. I became obsessed with Lee Marvin of finding every single movie he was in and he was in a lot. But just like, Oh my God, what does Lee Marvin behave how these guys are? I got to go watch every Lee Marvin movie now. I've always really liked the transfer of Rage. And. Power. And how Michael Madsen just fucking leaning against soda like I love that sequence so much. I Love that. And then of course, the standoff at the end, which as I mentioned, borrows really heavily from City on Fire. But yeah, favorite scene sequence. The commode story. I know that is great. I loved rewatching this scene where we get the flashback of Mr. Blond when he goes into the office. Oh, my God. And the grab saying the wrestling. Yeah. And then like, I don't know, there was just this idea where they were saying, we're going to set you up working at this dock, but you're not going to be working there. It's conflict that Madsen has where he wants to go back to crime. I don't know. There is just a certain like flow to that scene that I just like really enjoyed living in. And I feel like that's a scene that doesn't get talked about ever when it comes to this movie. So I just wanted to bring one a. Bit of trivia about that that you may not have some insight into, because I know you haven't seen. Natural Born Killers. But the. Parole officer. They're talking about more Scarnati Yeah. Size for his character in Natural Born Killers has a last name gag net, so they're related. I mean, he does this all the time, like, yeah, no. Vic Vega is Michael Madsen. Vincent Vega in Pulp Fiction. John Travolta. I am not going into the. Tarantino universe on. This podcast. There is, yeah. There are literally entire. Websites dedicated to how all of his films are connected, how Eli. Roth's character, the Bear. Jew, is the dad of. The producers. Saul Rubinek and True Romance has the same last name. So there's there's all this little shit like that but that so when he's saying. Seymore. Scarnati. That is a character in the Tarantino universe, just. Like when we meet Mr. White, he's talking about Alabama, which. Is the Patricia Arquette character from True Romance. It's all connected, baby. It's all connected. Yeah. I love that scene, too. I love how does that. And then the last. Category for each movie. I'm just going to talk about some influences that maybe we haven't talked along the way. These are the movies that. I personally watched or. Rewatched because I. Knew these were all very important. To the development of this specific film. So for Reservoir. Dogs, I had Kansas City Confidential Fantasy tastic film. Noir from 19. 52, directed by Phil. Karlson. I highly recommend this. Reservoir Dogs is. All. Over this. I loved it. So you're doing some noir because it's November. Can't go wrong with. Kansas City Confidential Killing by Stanley Kubrick. Yeah. Hugely important to Reservoir Dogs. The films of John Parker Melville. I cannot. Stress this. Enough. Leaderless and led Duke some soufflé. You know, I tried those scripts. The first one they do. Tarantino said. That's his favorite script ever. And there are like lines of dialog that are in Reservoir Dogs from this, I promise. This was a. Great one for me. This next, the remake of. Breathless. In 1980. Three, starring Richard Gere, which I never, ever had a desire. To see, because, like. You remade. Breathless. Yes, I do. Loved this movie. This is one of my favorite. Richard Gere performances. Not a perfect movie. The reason why. I watched it is because. Tarantino. On his podcast, which is a goldmine. For any Tarantino. Fan, he said that the movie. Breathless. 19. 83 was the first movie. He saw where he went, Holy shit, that's exactly what I want to do. That is a Quentin Tarantino movie. Whenever the hell I get around to. Making movies, that's what I'm going to do. There are so many. Similarities with this breathless two Reservoir Dogs, particularly Tim Roth's apartment, Silver Surfer. All that stuff the way like, you know, the. Car. Scene in Pulp Fiction, how it's like. Very, very intentionally, just a screen in the background. Old school stuff. They do that a lot in Breathless. I really like. That. And then one we've hammered home a lot. City on Fire from 1987 starring. Charlie Young Fat just lots. Similarities there between that and Reservoir Dogs it's all. Yeah but it's okay. Spiders got a couple of flies. Here we go. Two years later. Pulp Fiction, 19. 94, one of the most important. Movies of my life. Certainly, I. Argue. That Pulp Fiction is the most influential film since it. Was released. I was trying to think of an objective way to sell this movie. Fans of the podcast know this is my second. Favorite. Movie of all time, and I think that's it. I would hear other arguments. But I don't think any film since 1994 is. Pulp Fiction has had more influence. This art form in storytelling. Style, in editing. Character. Intention dialog, soundtrack selection. It will be. Forever remembered as. A seminal. American film. I think it belongs in. The top tier of cinema. Where it has been since. 94, where. I believe it will stay. I'm not suggesting this. Movie is for everyone. I'm not I'm not suggesting that any movie. Ever made is for everyone. I don't think a more influential. One has been made since. I have to agree. I have. To agree. Oh, I didn't know if you'd go with me on that. Oh, no. 100% it. When you look at the history of film, you have over the years, all of these movies that just like raise the bar to a certain level or this is what a movie can do that it can never we never seen before. This was clearly and he talks about this a lot. He saw the landscape of where movies were at in the late eighties, early nineties. And he was like, I know what to do here. I know how to insert what needs to be done in movies today. No one else does. I do, and I'm going to do it. And I think that's what makes him one of my all time favorites, is because of that, because his work, these beginning movies, this is where he just kicked the door down completely. And this is the one of the best movies ever made. Yeah. Like Reservoir Dogs was. Not a hit in. Theaters. It was just too small. The movie before, like. Indie movies, had. Core distribution would. Have played in, like, cities and stuff. When that movie hit home video and got to colleges, that's. When Reservoir Dogs. Took off. And then in those two years, enough people had seen it and were excited about Pulp Fiction that this movie just makes an absolute killing. It wins the Palme. d'Or over. Christoph Off Classics Red, which was like a hotly contested thing when it happened. So it's being released in America. To a lot. Of fanfare. And I was talking with my dad about this and just getting his. You know, Tarantino. Takes Pulp Fiction was the. First movie. He saw, but he went to. The theater. And I mean, he my mom just went it's like it's the movie that's coming out this weekend and they'd like heard things about it. And my dad said when he was sitting. There in the theater. It was one of the most shocking movies he. Had ever seen in the theater. Not just because of the violence. Or. Things that. Happened throughout the movie. It was the way it was told that you could feel it in the. Theater, that everyone. Having to catch up with it, he said. He's like, I cannot emphasize how fucking cool it was to see. A hero from my. Childhood that we all love John Travolta dancing again. That's how we got to know it. Was in Grease. Saturday Night Fever. And now he's dancing again. And it's like it because, you know Travolta it's been talked about a lot was not in a good place when this movie came out careerwise. Like, I think I knew this guy as the dad. From Look. Who's Talking. I seriously think when I saw Pulp Fiction, I'd seen Grease and look who's talking. And like, that's it. You know, I didn't I didn't. Have Carrie under my. Belt blow out, things like that. But I like to put that history on it, too. And then talking about how. Important these movies are to me, you. Know. Deliverance is one of Tarantino's favorite movies. The novel and the movie. When I found out. That Deliverance was. The main. Source of inspiration for the. Gold Watch with Bruce Willis and. Ving Rhames, I became nearly as. Obsessed. With deliverance as I. Am with Pulp Fiction back again to the so much question that it doesn't bother me at all. But yeah. Yeah, there's no beat in it that I don't love. I think that gold watch. I mean, talking about not knowing like. Where. Things are going, there's just no way. This is what I'm talking about. How fucking mindblowing that was. Like you're on the run. We are in a movie. We have a. Boxer who lied. To a. Gangster. Now he's chasing after him. There's been gunshots. There's been a car accident. We're in a movie. And then he just stumbles into a pawn shop. And now we're in a completely. Fucking different movie. Completely different. That I had. Never seen in a movie before. And he's he's literally. Getting this from, like, Deliverance, you know? But it was. So startling to. Me. And when I say it out, black, we fed up with the ball gags in the mouth and oh, my God. I'll never forget it. I'll never, ever forget it. I mean, the thing that makes all of these sections work so well is that they're they're ultimately they're so simple. The first one is just about this one character we met who does this thing, this occupation. He's got to take out this girl and then whatever happens. But that is the thing. So let's start to interject is that a test is Marsellus Wallace testing him? Because as Travolta says. In the mirror, this is a test. This is a test of one man's ability, you know, like is. Yeah, because there's some there's some stuff going on there. So is that a test of like, let me see if you come onto my. Wife and she reports to me. I don't know. I think that's I don't have definitive answers to these things, but I love these questions. Throughout Tarantino's work. Like it was that intentional? You know, I just love that. I love that. Well, yeah, I mean, of course. I mean, I think I mean but I think that's also like, you know, that that's another layer to what makes that scene. You know, one could just be like, well, why doesn't he just go for it? Clearly there's goings on, but it's like, no, he is the worker be of of it of like he's going to die if this night doesn't go well. I mean, even the simple suggestion. Of him bringing. Up the foot massage thing, like, is tenuous. Like, yeah, it's, you know. It's right on the edge. There. You need to you're going to go home, jerk off, and that's all you need to do. Like that's what you need to do. The stakes of this scene are if this night does not go well in Mia's eyes, John Travolta's a dead man. Have you ever been in a date where your life. Is at stake? Depending on how it goes. Oh. Oh, fuck me. Yeah, but again, it's so simple. But then you also get to the gold watch. And the crux of this scene is that this guy's girlfriend forgot something very, very important. Specifically reminded her. It's so. So what does he have to do? He has to go back now. Now, these are so simple. But Coen Tarantino has done masterful storytelling in terms of why this matters. So you get Christopher Walken's giant, ridiculous monologue. But by the time that. When you hear that bell, you know. This dude's never letting go. This watch. For the rest of. His life. Like, yeah, if he has. There you go. Be put into hell in a basement. Yes, he will. Yeah. And that's where every one of these scenes goes is it starts out with a brilliant set up, followed by a simple need that the character needs to do. And then where each one goes is no one could have ever predicted that this is where it's going to go. And nothing. Gets more unpredictable. Than I just shot more of it in the States. And that's exactly it. Yeah, like that. Like all of the season four and now we have to get this car that. Oh, my God, that's. And you just, you just got to deliver it like the job's done. We're going home, but. Nope, you just. Yeah. Shot him in the face. Let me do it. And then the whole rest of that scene is just like, how do we get these guys out of a time situation before the body situation? And it's just simple, but that's the most lighthearted one because that one, that's pretty much almost all comedy. Yeah. It's the one where the stakes are talked about the most to understand that if Barney comes home, this is not a good thing. You wouldn't appreciate it. None too. Much. That's right. Yeah, she wouldn't appreciate it. None too much. And. And then even Samuel Jackson. I don't think you realize the like, you know, we. Still did love it, so. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Did he like did I love that idea because he like, he's like yelling at Travolta and then he just he pauses. He's like, look, man, you know, I threatened you. You know, I respect you. All right? And justice goes, that's that's what he needed. That's what Travolta that's what Vince Yeah. It's a big it needs. It's just that little validations like, fine, go talk to your friend. I don't care. I love when they're in the car. It's great. And he's in Samuel Jackson's in the backseat and he's just giving it to Travolta both as like. I'm just saying, Jules, I got a line. I got a threshold, and you're getting real close to cross. And. Oh, yeah, I'm a mushroom. Motherfucker, motherfucker. Why am I in the back seat? You must be on brain detail. Oh, my God. My friend Kristen. I can't tell you. We watched. This fucker hundreds. Of times, and we would just hone in on lines on that. And then when other kids got a hold of it, they're. Walking. Around school going, I'm a. Mushroom. Cloud playing motherfucker. Motherfucker. Chris and I are walking around school. Going, What the fuck about doing at the back? Like, that's what we think is fun. Yeah, well, I buy all we. Yeah, we switch it. Oh, my God. It's just great. Oh, what else? The the energy that is exhibited in the whole entire part of of the Mia Wallace scene. Everyone plays that so perfectly. Just real quick there. Again, the movie is is this dude going. To cross. The line with his boss's wife? He comes out of the bathroom. We're in a totally separate movie, that's all. But yeah. Yep. The fact that John Travolta fucking one of the favorite shots of the whole entire movie is when Eric Stoltz is, like, looking out his like, door, and Travolta's car. Comes running through and slams into the house, addresses the car to the house. If you go 45, I look, it's cars. It's like this like. Destroyed this. House. They don't even care. Destroyed. So the runaround is like my little fucking black medical book. Well, once they get into the house, that's all. One shot the guts. Yeah, that's all. One shot. And the kids, the shit camera's just. Standing there in that corner, like. Pivoting back and forth. So you can still see. Stoltz running into the junk room. Which is just like, Yeah, all these little details are so fucking perfect. Yeah, all that. That ramped up energy. You got that. One woman who's just sitting there just like smoking a bowl. She's like, doesn't move off the couch at all. It's all this frenetic energy. And that was so my my dad was like, you're just sitting there in the theater. Like, I've never seen this before. Like. What the hell are they injecting her with? Like, what is that the way he explains it so well? Yeah. Stab or three times. Don't get a fucking step. But you got to see her hard enough because like through this and. The sound of when he's. Tapping on the breastplate, she's got this breastplate, you got it. You got punctured through it. They shot that in reverse. So they had like Travolta's hand and the needle. Already in her chest, and then he brought it up very. Quickly. So then in editing first so that it looks like. He's bringing it. Down quickly, but they actually. Cut away right before he hits her. So which is they do go to have that amazing look, his sound effect, the sound so good. For the most part, like Quentin usually kind of cuts away from that. Like this is something that isn't talked about a lot. But yes, he does. Yes, he. Does. Like this scene. The thing that you're terrified about seeing this might be too violent is what he cuts away from. Like right at he builds it up, but then even even the ear cutting scene. Yeah, no, no ear cutting. He completely pans away. I promise I will get back to the ear cutting scene, but yeah. Completely pans away. Go watch the fucking deleted scenes. For Reservoir Dogs. He's got two other angles. For one is a fucking closeup where you see him just hack it off mean it was it's. All very intentional. Yeah. Favorite character. Pulp Fiction is the one I thought a lot about. I mean, there's. No wrong answer. I guess there is a wrong answer. I mean, yeah, there is. There's Matt Martin. Yeah. But I just got to say, I'm having so much fun right now. I think it's fantastic. I like this. Is this I fear that this is going to run long. So I'm say it because we're we're film. Two of ten but I don't care of shit I don't have anything to do today. This is why Quentin Tarantino why we're doing is because his movies are fun. His movies as good as they are, as violent as they're all fun. Every single one of them is fun. And they're fun to. Talk about. Yeah, we're like you and I have talked about Tarantino so much, you know. I've never really. Sat down and been like, Alright, man, fucking Steven Spielberg, what do you think? Like we, you know, and that's okay. We both love him. We just did all. Commentary. On one of his best movies, but we have talked about Tarantino so much and honestly, the things you and I are talking about now so far in this podcast. We've never even talked. About together like is there. So we've never talked about this. Yeah, so much talk about. So that's what's so cool. It's like even getting. Into our favorite character and favorite like I like what you did with the Reservoir Dogs. Scene. Like, yeah, let's get let's get down with the granular. So I mean stuck in the middle. With you very big scene. But I'm also trying to talk about other stuff too. But you want to go first. The favorite character. Yeah, I'll go first. But I just want to have that little citation because I think I just realized something that I think I that in my list of my favorite filmmakers, the reason if I had to put one word to Quentin Tarantino as to why I think he's great, it's fun. Yeah, he's he's truly a fun, fun director to watch his work. Okay. Favorite character. I got to go with John Travolta. Yeah. I really love Bruce Willis in this movie. I think. I think he is. It's a knock out performance from him on a lot of levels. Samuel Jackson, what can you say? Like but Uma Thurman, so cool. But John Travolta, man, I think like this is this is his movie in that way. Yeah, this is one of. My favorite like performances in any Tarantino. Movie. The fact that I mean, Daniel Day-Lewis actively campaigned for. This part. And was trying to get in touch with Tarantino, like, please, will you let me do this? Tarantino wrote this part for Michael Madsen. This was supposed to be Michael Madsen. I don't necessarily think. Reprising his role as. Vic Vega slash. Mr. Blond. But we talked to this. Madsen was already attached to. Wyatt Earp, so he couldn't. Do this. He felt. Very. Bad about it. They both said it was just a bummer. But what Travolta does like, it's kind of the. Thing where I'm almost. Glad they haven't. Worked together again. Yet. Just leave it. There. You know you did it right. I would love to work together again. Don't me wrong. I mean, I would have I would love that. But it just makes sense that like it's this one beautiful performance. You brought a star back. And if anyone. Knows Travolta. Now, the dude was. In a career all time career low. In 1994. This completely. Surged. Him back to like the top of the A-list. And I love that. My favorite character, I. Mean, you know, it's Butch. It's Bruce. Like, I love Butch so much. Yeah, it's it's I love Butch because he goes back, takes his time going back. He finds that perfect weapon, but he does indeed go back. And I'm not saying this is an entirely selfless act. He does save Marsellus, but he also does save himself. From. Marsellus. But yeah. When you think about how much money Butch has now, you know, next time I see you'll be on Tennessee time. He's got his lady. He should be all set. It's a morning of carnage. But, you know, Z's got to be dead, baby. I just. I love that there's something. When he opens that. Door and he's free. You hear what these monsters are doing. To him in the basement? It's like it's my assumption that they are going to kill both of them. They're not going to let them go like Marsellus. Wallace and Butch are dead. So if Bruce Willis Butch thinks this as well, the dude ain't got nothing to worry about. I mean, he. Could leave right now and literally be home free. He's. He's the number one villain in his life. His arch nemesis is dead, and he has no connection to these people. So he could just be gone. But he goes back as any decent human being would. And it's just one of the certainly one of the most infamous scenes I've ever seen in a movie. But Jesus, I love the whole just the way the whole thing, the way it's played. Step aside, Butch, and, you know. Their whole interaction. Like you. Lost your L.A. privileges. But it's just. Yeah, I'm pretty fucking far from okay. Like, it's. And then meanwhile, you've got the guy screaming because you just got shot in the nuts, right? Yeah. That's a really good call. Yeah. Yeah. Well. Since we're here, I'm going to. Well, go back to needle drop. I'm just going to mention my. Favorite scene. In set piece because it's easily it's. From. Motherfucker to Z said. Those are. 17 of the most. Memorable. Movie minutes of my life and you know Z it's. Maynard Spyder cut. A couple of flights like Maynard. Who the fuck is that? Dave? I've never heard that day before. Yeah, outside of movies that Tarantino was influenced by, I'll. Do my favorite scene. It's the Jackrabbit Slim's scene. I love it. Jesus Christ. The reason I want to talk about it is because of it taught me a lot about cinematography. Well, it opens. With that oner when they. Walk in. That's one shot. Yeah. It opens with the oner where you are completely immersed in this one location because there's nothing fancy about the shot. We're just following them in. And the camera's sort of following John Travolta's POV in a way, because he's a little messed up, he's a little high on heroin. He's getting caught off guard by Alex. He's they do a double take. It's like, wait, was that. Oh, he's he's clocking. He's clocking the weight. Yeah. Like, oh, that's Mimi Van Doren and he does that. Yeah. And then you sit in the car and like, by the time you sit in the car, you feel like you understand the feeling of this restaurant. But there's that great thing that. He, like walks past. Her just. Before we get to, you know? And then she's like, Yeah, I love that. Yeah. Then we get to the car. Yes, yes. I love yeah, I love that one. Yeah. You know something that we kind of talk about how, you know, there's the whole entire like shot, shot, master shot over the over the shoulder, shot over the shoulder. Master. This might be the best example of the way that that works. I'm sorry. There is a better example by him. This is like a good template for it. When we get the opening of. Inglourious Basterds, he has. Oh, no, it's down. Yes. I because I know where you're going. But yes, you're right. You're right. This is knowing when to, like push in for the medium, pushing for the close. Yes. Like in a weird way, like that opening scene of Inglourious. This was the training scene. This was that scene. Absolutely. Yes. But if you really watch all of this movie and this is also mirrored in the last scene with Tim Roth and Samuel Jackson, you get used to seeing someone, your character in your bouncing back and forth. But when something has now changed in the scene there, we've now moved on to a different conversation, a different topic. Someone said something, something has happened. The camera then changes and like just pay attention as to why, because that's it's all being done for a reason. I do want to hone in on this a little bit in case some people. Are a little. Confused by what we're talking about. Like if you're going to shoot a conversation between two people, you have to actually, you know, film that. And yeah, you. Know, very. Famously, it's like David. Fincher filmed 100 Takes. 99 takes of Jesse Eisenberg. And Rooney Mara for the first. Scene of Social. Network. The reason. Why that's so many takes, because you have a. Lot of different coverage. And so for Pulp Fiction, it's not just. Like we're shooting. One angle of John and then one angle of Uma. We're doing like wide shots. We can see them. We're doing over the shoulder, we're. Punching in. Closer. We're going in for close ups. You have to. Cover all. That and do that now. Now, what I find. Very. Often the language of TV is that they just use. Whatever take. Was best. Like whatever takes. Best. For that for the line delivery from the actor. It doesn't matter if we're. Close up. Over the shoulder to shot Master, doesn't matter where we're. Performing. Actor Performance based. It was right there, so we're just bouncing all around now. So for directors like Tarantino. When he's filming the. Jack. Slim scene, he knows based on his line of dialog exactly when he's going to cut into the closeness. Of Uma Thurman. He is that is not going to be. Dependent on performance. So he. Already. Knows that this is what's called filming in-camera. This is like what it means. He knows exactly. I know that I'm going to go. In here for you on. This. And that's how you. Create. And establish this language. And we can get to it when we get. To Inglourious Basterds. But the first time we're really, really. Close on Christoph Waltz, his face is when he's about to say. You're harboring enemies of the state, aren't you? And we. Are right on him. Because things have changed. So this. Is all very important to where like you can write really good. Dialog, but if you are not shooting that well. You are doing that. Dialog a. Disservice. Because people, people are just. Going to be thrown off their. Eyeline. You're going to be off, you. Know, whatever. But it is a lot of. Small reasons. Like this that you get a. Masterpiece. Like Pulp Fiction because this attention to detail is applied to. Everything. And none of this comes easy. That's all I'm saying. None of this is made by mistake. This is all. Very, very thought. Out. But since you just brought up. Your favorite. Scene and then how that goes to the dance, it's definitely that was my second. Favorite needle drop. You never can tell by Chuck Berry. Because I just I mean that that's one. Of my favorite dance. Sequences in all the film. It is infuriating that he slowly fades to black. Does he get it? He does it on purpose. He's such an. Asshole. You can sit there and watch 130 minutes. Yeah. Yeah, but. Monsieur Lu, if. That's how you say it, that Dick Dale and his Dell tones, the song that opens the movie is that is a song that. Is forever married to. Pulp Fiction. Me, I never heard any. Oh, yes. And that just, you know. The freeze frame on a man, a plumber, the. Song hits. Were just off those credits. The way. The fucking song changes the cool in the gang. Halfway through. I think it's not my favorite needle drop of the movie, but I want to talk. I'm glad you brought it up. I don't think that there is a piece of music that can set up a like the tone of a movie better like it. Like it's a perfect piece of music to describe. It'd be like, All right, sit in, buckle up. This how this movie's going to feel? Yeah, I would love to hear. Do you know how he came to that song? This, like, because he's always so thoughtful, but, yeah. He just it was a song that he liked and I think it was. Actually written into the script. Like, some of these songs. Are actually. Written to the screenplay. He always knew this was going to be the song. It's just crazy. This is going to be the way that he knows. Perfect. And I'm going to have that huge font that. Rolls orange, scrolls up the orange. Yellow thing. And I'm going to yeah, and I know that in the middle I'm going to change it like it sounds like someone's. The radio and we're going to go. To in the gang like it's it's nuts well-thought out this stuff. Is. But what's your favorite? Favorite one is girl you'll be a woman soon over hot heads. There's just something because I love the Neil Diamond version of that song. That's the original I always thought is like, Wow, he went with this version. But when that happens, like, it's just like it's a perfect song to put on and come home to, like how he uses it and she's just dancing. But then she finds the fucking drugs, and now you've got, like, this whole entire feeling where at first you're, like, dancing with her and you're feeling the music you got doing the whole the whole music. Explained the background to him, you know, talking to himself in the mirror while she's finding this bag. And then it's like as it's going on, you're like, No, don't do it. Don't do it. And then. It's a rough ride right. There. Yikes. Oh. That's a great. One. I love that scene, too. So then moving right on to my influences. I mentioned it one. Of Tarantino's favorite filmmakers. Was Don SIEGEL in his 19. 73 thriller, Charlie. Shark, starring Walter Matthau. I just watch. This for the first. Time, and it contains, among other things, a. Character name Maynard. Saying. They're going to strip you. Naked and to work on you with a. Pair of pliers and a blow torch. Wow. Yes, yes, yes. So you see, if you fall into the school of Tarantino, you're discovering cinema itself. I mean, it's like you watch. One Tarantino movie. And if you investigate, all the movies influence that. That's how you become a super film fan like I am today, in part. And then, I mean, there's so many influences over Pulp Fiction. I just wanted to call that one out because of that line. But the dance scene is like it's like half band. Apart. By. Godard. Which Tarantino named his production company. After and. Then half the dance in eight and a half by Fellini. Just good stuff. I mean, the Pulp Fiction. Influences are everywhere, you. Know, seagulls. Yeah. One of my I don't know if I was making a list of like the five takeaways, five bullet points I want people to have from today. Number one is I want people to stop sleeping on Jackie Brown. I want people to go watch this again and again and see why this is the. Most mature film. He's made. I want you to understand that he was. 33 years. Old when he made this, and. Every major actor in it is in their late forties, early fifties. Sixties. Brigitte Fonda was 32 when she made this. She's the. Youngest character in the. Movie. But everyone else in the movie, they're. Talking about retirement. It's my last job, you know I spend the rest of my life spending Max Cherry. He wants out of the bail bonds. Gabe Jackie wants to jump. Across a 110th Street. Jail. This is, like, the coolest man. I'm too old for this shit movie. It's hip. Mature. Full of old school, L.A. style. I love those cocktail. Bars they. Go into. Jackie Brown is only. Tarantino. Movie. I did not like the first time I saw it. I watched it the day it was available to rent on VHS in 1997, 1998. Didn't see it in the theater. And I remember it being like an hour into this. Gone, what the fuck is going on? I have no idea what anyone's talking about, what they're doing. Turned it off. It didn't leave my head went back to like two. Months later and went. Oh, I get it. I'm too young for this movie. I was too young. For Reservoir Dogs and. Pulp Fiction, too. But I understood a lot less of. Jackie Brown. Than I. Did of those others. But I knew I'd watch. Something really, really. Good. So now I've. Developed this relationship. To it. They're like, I just I. Jackie Brown, like. So much. I want so many people to just go watch this. Movie over and over. Obviously, I love it. Tell me your Jackie Brown thoughts. Oh, this really so cool bed. So I know this woman and she was a film critic back in the nineties, so she was always working at Cannes and all this stuff and so she was doing the interview for the cast of Jackie Brown after she saw it and she did not like the movie. She was in her young in her early twenties. She was brazen enough to be like two like the cast face. Quentin Tarantino wasn't there and she was like, I thought this movie was slow and I thought it was boring. And Samuel Jackson, of all, you know, is the one that sort of like, how old are you and she? And whatever age he's in early twenties and she's like, he goes, The reason you had a problem with this movie is because you didn't want to have the patience to realize that this movie, it moves and is meant for people of a certain age. Boom. Your point that you just made about all of these people being in their like mid-late forties, maybe even early fifties, and they're winding down with what want that is the pace of the movie and the things that they want are not necessary. Well, I mean, Samuel Jackson wants a lot of money, but like what they want is relatively simple. The first time I saw this movie, I was just like you. I. I didn't like. It. Yeah, I was in good will hunting range. Like, these guys are talking, saying all these F-bombs. Exactly like how I want to talk with my friends and, like, I still love Good Will Hunting. I'm not like, you know, I was just I was kind of in a different vibe. And the reason. Why I didn't like Jackie Brown. Is because it was in Pulp Fiction and I wanted it to be fiction. I wanted Reservoir Dogs part two, Pulp Fiction, part two. And it wasn't that, because how the fuck do you know Pulp Fiction? You can't. You zag. You have to zag. It's one of the best of times. Eggs. I also want to say this, is the only movie he's made that's based on someone else's material. I mean, he gets to her. Elmore Leonard from Punch, which I read for the first time for. This podcast. And it was great. It's just a very, very different version of Tarantino for the pacing that it has. It can feel a little people's, you know, complaints about it, that it is slow, it is this. But I think it's honestly one of his most fun. I do, too. I do, too. He is. I love it so much the one scene in particular I want to talk about is the scene where Samuel Jackson confronts Pam Grier when she just gets back and they're in her house. And they're I think it's a gun pressed up against my dick. Sorry. Don't go back and watch this scene and look at the black king. Yeah. This scene goes all over the place. It starts out in the dark. They they it's playing with blocking sound, split screen lighting. He's just going everywhere in this. One shot scene. Yeah. One, one. Shot, one and two. And all the shit you watch is you're like, what are we watching? Because you're like, Wait a minute. And see about the killer. Like, there's like. An hour and a half left in this movie. Like, how is she going to get out of this? And he's turning down the light, turning it on, turning it down. And then, yeah, and then we get the split screen that Yeah. Sends it home and then you see Max. Figuring it out right as we hear the gun. Cock. Oh, my God. I love it so much. When you rewatch this movie or watch it for the first time, it just pay attention to all the ways that Tarantino is having fun in the colors. Oh My God, the colors of this movie. It's so L.A. Beach. Bright Yeah. Vivid her that blue suit, you know, even the business suit, the bad ass business suit and black ops. Bridget Fonda's. Tan. She's so dark and it just really she's so tell. Oh, I love it. There's one scene that I think is just the perfect way that that talks about how film can do something that other mediums can't. The scene where Robert Forster is doing his job and he's going to pick up Pam Grier from jail to get her out, bail her out. This the thing that he does every day. He's not fazed by any of this shit. He's like, all right. He's not fazed by. Dropping one off. Picking one up. Yeah, yeah. Forster sits down, is waiting for Pam Grier to come out. We fade to black. But when we fade back in not a lot of time has passed. It's the same night. Yeah, it's just now. Pam Grier is coming out and this is what he does every day. But now something changed. What's different about today is now he has set eyes on some of the he's just fallen in love with you. And when you fall in love, you know, at first sight, something is different about today. This is different than any other day that you've had on doing this job. And when that happens and the music plays and the way that he looks at her, it's beautiful. It's just so well fucking done. I love that. I love that little scene cut. I love that too. Okay. Actually I want to. Go straight to just my favorite scene. And sequence of the movie as opposed. To favorite character, because I'm going to jump straight there because. My. Favorite. Set piece of this movie, I think it is some of the most ingenious. Engineering I've ever. Seen in one of his movies, thanks. Largely. To his longtime editor, Sally Menke, who sadly passed away in 2010. It's when that title card comes up and it says Money exchange. For real this. Time. And then the next 21 minutes. Are just. Yeah. Absolute brilliance. Here's what happens. Jackie hides the money. From Ray Nicolette. Max goes to the movie. It's just a great detail. Melanie takes forever to get ready. Ordell is pissed, Lewis is pissed. There's timestamps popping up on the screen. They're doubling back on themselves and. Echoing in order. Street life is blaring away. Jackie's the mall. She takes it all in. We get that great shot of her taking. It all in. There's the whole bit with the business suit. Then it's. Jackie's perspective versus Lewis's perspective versus Max's. Perspective. And you got. Yeah, you know. Jackie's frantically running out. Ray. Ray, where are you? I love that. Got to love when Lewis spots Max and then Max kind of waves it. And then Max tracking the bags and just walking out with him, that whole damn thing. 21 minutes. It's a long portion of a. Movie, and it just moves well. It's one of. My favorite. Genuine set pieces that. He's ever done, and that's. Why I wanted to call it out. Here early. I got I love that sequence so much. I know I agree. And if we are jumping into our into our section with this movie, that is mine as well. Oh, really? Oh two That's awesome. Yeah, it's so good. And does not take the audience for granted at all. He gives you those little time stamps. But there are things that when we do cut points of view, he's not making it clear. No, no, he's not. Once it's revealed to you, you're. Oh, that dawning realization. Oh, now we're watching somebody else because you're following it. But have questions. Oh, yeah. Well, we've just gone back in time a little bit. Now we're seeing how this got there. Okay, now your brain has permission to start putting pieces together. By way of doing that, though it also makes it the most entertaining. Perfect. Well, yeah, because we're like. We're seeing this money. Exchange three different times from three. Perspectives, but, like, the way it's. Hysterical. Just the way. Robert De Niro and Bridget Fonda fighting. When they've gotten along. Throughout the rest of the movie. You know, like they're just two stoners together. Oh, a couple. Of Cheech jogs, and I mean, his hair's all slicked back. You take it so. Seriously. The way he wants to hold the bag, she's like, Oh, yeah. He goes, I'll knock you out like, Give it to me. I can't find the car. Oh, my God. It's really one of the most brilliant. Sequences of his. Career, and I'm so glad that was your favorite set. Piece as. Well. All right. Favorite character. I got a deep cut for you here. It's no question. It's fucking Ray. Nicolette, Michael Keaton. I love. Ray. Nicolet so much you're alone. Oh, my God. I'm absolutely going. Keaton. I'm Rip. It's your favorite character in the whole movie. No fucking question. The swagger, the leather jacket with the white shirt. He's wearing sandals, Ultimate Flex. He just adjusts himself while targeting Jackie in a way that's not sexual, but, like, he's just so. Frustrated. Like, you know, no money. When I go to a reunion and going, Oh, you don't know. Oh, God, I love and I. Love Ray. Nicolet. How weird that, you know. Jackie Brown made. By Miramax, directed by Quentin Tarantino. Out of Sight. Made the next year by Universal, directed by Soderbergh. Keaton cameos in both is just priceless. I don't know how many times that's been done. Before, like. Two completely. Different properties at different studios. There are more obvious picks here. I obviously love. Pam Grier as Jackie Brown. I mean, no Oscar nomination is absolutely ridiculous. But yeah, Ray Nicollette. Is just yeah, that's my top. I love that you picked that. Oh, my God oh my God. I was. Blowing that. Oh, the first time we see him, it's that slow fade and he's just like walking down the hallway, just got off his bike, you know? How do you suppose he knows you, Jackie? Oh, I love him making the coffee. I love him. Who's yours? Oh, I got to go with Robert Forster. Max Cherry. Oh, God is great. And we. Should say this was like. He very deliberately. Sought him out because this was one of. Tarantino's favorite actors from the. Sixties and seventies. And he very deliberately. Sought out this, like. Veteran character actor. Be in this. And he's so good. He's so, so good. To give him a lead type because it's a very ensemble movie, but to give him a very, very pivotal lead type performance, it's something you don't see from him a lot. And he carries it. Oh, yeah, the way that he looks at Jackie because like the way that that love story is handled is so beautiful and so subtle. The way that he just looks at her in every single scene. That's just a man who's in love. Yeah, he really is. He's not crazy about it. And he just gets to stand next to you and marvel something he loves. Yeah, and that's enough for him, right? Well, that's why I love the scene after the one you loved when it's similar. Jackson confronting Pam Grier and her partner in the scene after is when Max Cherry two shows up at her. House and she's like, I guess you want your gun back. Like, you know, he's not flipping out like she's and she could be go back to jail for that. She should be going back to jail. For that, probably. Yeah. And he's like, you know, you can hang on to it. It wouldn't be legal in the way they're just sitting there. And she puts on the music and he's like complimenting her looks, you know? She's like, Well, it got bigger. And you. See, if just basically go another. Wrong. With that, like, oh, it's just it's. So great. We never get to. See people this age. Kind of falling for each other. Like this, even if there is some, you know, some. Other. Objectives going on, like robbing. An arms dealer. So, yeah, it's all good. Well, and you just brought up my needle drop moments do it when she when she starts playing. Didn't I blow your mind this time by the Delfonics. Oh, it's so good. And she, like, takes a beat too. Like, have, have it come in, Diana, Nana. And then you see him going to. Shop for it like later. Oh, it's just. Yeah, great. It's. And then he plays it. For Samuel. Jackson anti-Civil Jackson's like, I don't know, you got dad like this. You know, it's great. And it's so great because it's one of those examples of like the sauce where the, the song is being played in the scene. Yeah diegetic. Yeah my and it's a bit of a cheat baby. It is. Across 110th Street. By Bobby Womack in peace. I love it that's how we start and that is how we end. I just I love when you always do that. Whether it's through. Cinematography, through. Song, whatever it is. That out focus shot. On Robert Forster at the end. I cannot tell you how impactful that was and is to me still. It just is folds his hands and rests his hand on his chin. Oh, my God, John, they're holding on that final shot of Jackie. They're just fucking holding, holding, holding. Where the fuck was their Oscar nomination? It's ridiculous like. Robert Forster got nominated. That's great. But Helena Bonham. Carter. Wings of the Dove. Julie Christie Afterglow. Judi Dench. Mrs. Brown. Nichols. Last time you watch Brown. Yeah, exactly. I mean, come on. I'm not trying to be mean here. Kate Winslet for Titanic was going to get nominated. Helen Hunt, as good as it gets, is going to win, but. No Pam. Greer and nominee. Just. Ridiculous yeah influences you don't have. To look too hard here it's things. Like coffee from 1970. Three foxy brown from 1974 that is a great Jack. Hill Pamela. Greer double feature. If you want to go do that. I've done it. Before. And it's movies of that kind. It says this is ode to the blaxploitation. Genre, the Mac. Things like that. Jackie Brown comes out 1997, and if you had completely fallen in love with this man's. First three films. As I had, and then 2002 is when those. That's when Reservoir Dogs. Pulp and Jackie. Brown were released. On two disc DVD. So I was like, I'm just in full on obsession mode. We have to wait the longest gap between movies that he still has ever done, though, I fear. We're coming up on. We may have. It's longest ahead of us, but six years pass and then kill bill. Volume one hits. Theaters. In 2003, followed just a few months. Later by. Kill Bill Volume two in 2004. We are going to talk about these as yeah, I mean, when we get to. The categories, we'll break them up. But we're really just. Having a kill bill. Conversation. I'm not really interested. In talking about like which. One's better, which one's. This? Because he wrote this, he conceived it and he shot it all as one long while filming. He and Harvey. Weinstein come up with this idea of splitting it into two because he's like, Hey, this is. Going to be a four hour movie. So either you're going to have. To fight to make this. Thing like 3 hours, which he actually did try. And he. Said he came up with like a. Serviceable theatrical release that could have been around 3 hours or as they are now there. I have seen the officially combined version. It's it's like 345 without credits and repeat. Stuff. You know, 4 hours. But that's how we're going to approach this conversation. Because he often talks about it as one movie. But there are very. Few movies in my life that. I've been more excited for to see in the theater, like Scream two because of such a fan of Scream. And Kill Bill volume one. Like, I started working at a movie theater earlier, like several months earlier. But one of the reasons was I heard that. You got to see movies. Early if you worked there. And I just wanted to be able to see this. Early. And I did. I got to. See it a week early. I will never forget that night. It was a great night. I love these movies. This this was the I remember as a kid. I wasn't into I liked Jackie Chan and I liked Bruce Lee movies, but I suppose I wasn't really into the kung fu genre very much when. I saw these movies, I was like of two minds where I was like, I guess I was expecting. That's really the worst thing you can ever do is I was expecting something else and Ben then got what I got. So my first viewing of Kill Bill, I was like, Oh, don't know how I feel about it. But then the second viewing, once I understood what was what he was doing and what he was going for, that's when everything changed. Yeah, because it's not prestige like Reservoir Dogs, Paul and Jackie. Like those are all they have. Different degrees of prestige. This he he has admitted that of all the films he has made, Tarantino says the only movies that he could have actually made, the only movie was Kill Bill, because it has so much of him in it, so much of his style, he goes, you know, you could you could get. The Reservoir Dogs script to someone. And they could go make it. Tony Scott can make that. You could give my. Dirty. Dozen. Inspired Inglorious Bastard script. To someone, and they could probably go make a. Serviceable version of that. To what he. Says. These are his words. No one could have made Kill Bill the way that he made them. That's I love so much about him. But yeah, I didn't know. When I sat down for this, I had a little hint by the title and. I was reading some of his interviews. Like, I didn't think this was going to be prestige cinema. I didn't think he. Was going for Oscar. Nominations with Kill Bill. And I think that yeah, a lot of people off I think the the amount of blood the amount of. Very, very cartoonish blood threw a lot of. People off when you just go you know you can go. Watch Bruce Lee movie from. The seventies. I watched a bunch of the past week and they all do that like that. It's not you don't take. It literally. Like it's been going. On forever and ever. I just loved Oh my God, I had some you want to have some fun? When we are doing these director. Profiles, sometimes I'll go back and. Read reviews of their. Movies when their movies came out. Some of these critics are just like, I mean, they're saying. Like it's so anatomically, like. Yet accurate. I'm like, Are you fucking kidding me? Like you do you not understand that? He doesn't mean for this to be serious. But man, this is just kill Bill. It's cool, cool, cool. I mean, watching them back to back, it's like you. Have this great homage. To kung fu cinema and then you just completely switch it. It's like vast. Western, which really works. And, um, I guess we talked about this in the beginning about the homage thing and I kind of made the analogy that Kuti is kind of like a sample mashup artist, not unlike a. Hip hop producer, that. Sometimes it is more noticeable, as we. Mentioned, with Reservoir Dogs, but. Sometimes it's just so goddamn cool. As is the case with Kill Bill and all the Amazons in Kill Bill, it makes me not only. Appreciate. Kill Bill. More. But it makes me. Appreciate every. Movie that Kuti used as. Inspiration for this film. I this Tarantino's Kill Bill really is like the homage movie to end all homage movies. It's really, really something. But I was watching these back to back and I was like, I want this to be one. And it was taking me out of the experience because when I watched Kill Bill and I feel like I get to the end of Kill Bill one and I'm unsatisfied, and then I start watching Kill Bill two. I didn't end unsatisfied because that's the culmination of everything. But I just remember a whole entire time in watching Kill Bill two, I was like, I'm wishing that I didn't have a break. I wanted to experience this whole entire thing and find out that that was the way that he intended it. Oh, yes. Oh, yes. Both movies to me are good, but I would love a definitive version or something like what we got with The Hateful Eight, which we'll get to when we talk about that. But an extended cut broken up into chapters, into episodes, long form storytelling. I think this works really, really well in that format. I would love to see that. But it was it was a void that I was finding in my experience of watching these movies this time around. Sure, sure. So he did edit it. Together as one. Long movie called Kill Bill, The Whole. Bloody Affair. And I did get to see that at his theater, and it was just one of the best. Experiences I've ever had. Was it. Really? Yes. Yes. He's put it up at. The New Beverly a. Few times and it was like, I didn't even know you yet. I'd just gotten to L.A. and I'm like, Oh, my God, there. Oh, holy shit. I got to go see this. There really aren't any changes. It's just he's stitching them together. The main change is that when David. Carradine. Goes, does she know. That her daughter. Is still alive? And then we fade out? Yeah. It fades open with the massacre. At. The chapel. And you. So you don't get that. You know, the movie doesn't end, and you. Don't get her looking into the camera like. It's what the motion pictures called it, a bloodbath. Or, you know, you. Don't get her in the car doing. That thing. Yeah, yeah. And it's just really effective. It is. My understanding, I don't really. Know officially, but I think the rights to this and a lot of his. Films are. Tied up. With Harvey. Weinstein and it's going to be difficult. For him to get the rights back. To his movies when I imagine the. Only source. Of income that the Weinstein. Estate has right now is from, you know, profiting. Off of DVD sales. Repeat. Sales of these movies that he owns. But Tarantino, you know, the man. Has been flirting. With them doing ten movies, not. Flirting. He's been threatening. That he's doing it. So he's done the right. Thing here in. This shit since. Death proof. He's been. Saying it since 2006 when. I was reading Press. When he was talking about death proof. This is how long he's been saying it. I have a few ideas of what he might do. He's kind of suggested that he's going to be doing. A little more writing. That's good. If we live. In a world where. He is doing this and like he goes, okay, I'm spending the next two years just like putting Kill Bill in this order. Not that he would change much because he doesn't think he doesn't have. Like director's cuts of. His movies. He's very. Adamant about, Oh yeah, we're just doing that and giving. Us like a 4K Blu ray of like, here it is. One disc, one movie, put it on kill Bill. I think that would be. Really, really. Cool. But I. Understand for marketing purposes. They had to split it up. I will tell you, I'll. Be straight. Up that when I saw Kill Bill two. In the theaters I was. When it was going on, I was disappointed because I was like, where is the bad. Ass three that I saw. In volume one a few months ago? Yeah. And I went, oh, oh, he's doing something totally, totally different. Here we. Have. We've gone into like just a. Western of like, is it all going to work out? Yeah, man. It's just the fun to watch back to, back to. I mean, they're just really, really fun movies, you know? They don't ask a lot of us at all. They're not hard to follow. I'm going to have to find a showing of him doing the kill bill. He doesn't do much anymore. He does. Literally, he doesn't do it. Oh, I don't know. Why do. There is something with these movies. I don't know what it is. These movies like. There's their barebones. DVD. There's almost no special features. The Blu rays. Yeah, there's almost no special features. Whereas every other one of his. Movies, there's something going. On in them. There's like, Inglourious Basterds. Doesn't have too much, Django doesn't have too much, but there are some special. Features, like they took time, care and effort into. It, I don't know. I hope that's. One of his retirement projects. Put these movies. Together I hope I. Don't know. Like those scenes between David Carradine and Uma Thurman are so long. Oh, yeah, very. They're so good. Yeah. I would love to experience that in, like, a theater setting without a break or, like, maybe an intermission. But but like, just to jump right back in, because I remember I was having an issue with that one scene where it's a black and white with the car. When we opened Kill Bill two. Yeah, that's just like that's like a gimmicky thing. It's a gimmicky thing. But it took me out and that's just this experience. I feel like I'm bashing the movie and I'm not because I really, really enjoy these movies. But I guess it's all just sort of this feeling of like, I want to see it the way that the director intended it, right? And because that's how I feel about it when I'm watching it and to see everything from start to finish, I don't give a shit if it's 4 hours, give me a four hour shooting, give me an intermission. I don't care. I would. Love it. I would love it. Bring it on Babylon hours and 8 minutes. Oh, shit. Yeah. Damien Chazelle going for it. Kill Bill. Favorite character do we will do volume one and two back to back volume one. I'm going with Uma. So am I. The bride. Baby. Got to do it on that. Journey, lover. Yeah. I mean, that was that was kind of a no. No brainer to me rewatching. It. Like, that's a tough part honestly. Like. Yeah, when she wakes up in that coma and. Figures out by looking at her. Hands that her baby's gone, like that's that's a tough scene and like a fun hip action movie, you know, like, that's. Tough. And even like the dialog that she has, like, she's balancing like a very specific kind of over the top type of character. Very true versus the reality of the situations that she's in. So it's cartoonish in just the right moments and then it's real because we need to get to the grounded reality of like what her situation is. I love, I think my favorite moment of, hers is after that awesome fight scene between her and Vivica, a fox. She basically kills her mom, like, not like in front of her daughter, Kaboom. And She goes, if you if you're still feeling raw about it when you're older, I'll be waiting. Like because cut to 2025. When the first scene of Tarantino's. And final film, Kill Bill three is Zendaya. Ringing a doorbell? Older Uma Thurman. Beatrix kid, opens the doors the day it kills her. And then Maya Hawke, who now baby grow up and Zendaya go. On a bloodthirsty rampage. Hunt each other down. I just made that up. Are you kidding me? You just made up? That's fucking brilliant. I didn't just. Make it up right. Now to tell you how long I've been thinking about this 10th fucking movie like it's all about. And I'm. It's not all I think about. Come on, wait a minute. Let me back up. Some very, very cool person made a poster. Of Zendaya that said Kill. Bill three. So this. Isn't all. My original idea. But. The threads are there, my friend. And I'm just. Using her because it's. I don't know. The threads are there. It could be done and it could be fucking awesome. You got to kill the bride. Unfortunately, you got to kill her. That's how it. Begins. You know that Bebe's off living her life. Vivica Fox's daughter is raw. She's come back. It's a great fight. The beginning with Uma. Know Beatrice is older now and then. Yeah, that's it. What if it changes into something completely different from that point to like we connect the threads, but then the rest of the movie becomes like a Thelma and Louise. Sure. Yeah. Maybe they band together. I don't know. Sure, that's what he's for. That's why he's got two Oscars. I don't that dude. I love that idea. I mean, it would be so cool if he did that. But Maya Hawke. Great actor, you. Know, she sounds exactly like her mom. Uma Thurman didn't look and sound exactly like Vibe to. My favorite character. God I love him it's but Michael Madsen is but his scene with. Larry. Bishop hit. That strip club. Yeah is. Favorite. Passage of dialog in all of kill bill what are you trying to convince me of exactly? Yeah. Just in that fucking hat. Oh, my God. I love blood. There's so many interesting choices that I get, like, lying. To his brother that he. Hawk the. Sword. It's just, you know, it's another little dig at. His brother, another. Little, like, kind of fuck you, bud. Yeah. I love Bud. Love him. I'm so glad you brought that up, because he he's not my favorite character in this topic that I'm picking. But He would have been my second and I'm glad you brought me, because we also haven't we've talked about him a little bit in Reservoir Dogs, but Michael Madsen is one of 17. He's one of his guys. And God damn it, he's so good in this goddamn movie. He really. Is. He really. Is. His eyes like in every performance he ever gives, he's he's got so much going on behind his eyes. And that scene is amazing. I am so glad you brought him up, because I wanted to bring up him. And particularly in this movie, the way that I look at his eyes are so good. He's very expressive. Like Madsen has some of those takes. He likes that squint. Yeah. His head a lot like when he thinks he when he knows like he knows. She's there at the trailer and, you know, he's. Like in. The air and. He, like, kind of looks and does, you know, that's just it's one of his things. He it's a it's a little like a mean mulligan. And I love him for it. I love. Him. Yeah. It it's just right. It's just right for the tone. Yeah, it's. It fits perfectly. But I got to say, my favorite character in volume two is Bill David carried. Hell, yeah. Hell yeah, man. I could listen to him talk forever. His voice is just so, so good. And the way that he plays all of the scenes that he's in, in this movie I think are just perfect. Do you know. Who his first choice was for Bill? And he talked to them a lot. Like they met a lot. More in baby. No way. Really? Yeah. Or David Carradine was like fifth. Or sixth. Choice. It's a great choice. And it's. From you. Know, he was in a show, Kung Fu that Tarantino loves. So that helps. But it's just great casting. It's an actor that I never really seen before. I was more familiar with his brother Keith, who. Was in like Deadwood and stuff. I knew him a lot, but I didn't. I wasn't too. Familiar with David Carradine. But yeah, he's so great. I love, you know, let's see, I rewound like. Literally three. Times and I was watching. It was when he just walks down from my base like house and he's like, Oh, you know, it looks after you as this dude just like what happened to you? And he. Said, it's a friendly. Competition. Between friends. And you're like, Whatever went out of there? Like, he just went up and they kick the shit out of each other. I love that. When will I see you again? Title my favorite song from the seventies. Yeah. There's a couple of people that I know Kurt Tarantino has said, like he likes to say, like sing his dialog. You know, he talks about Samuel Jackson and Christoph Waltz and like you understand what he means. He says that there's certain guys that just are in his head and in his voice. I think in a weird way, David Carradine is like that in these movies. There's a there's a certain salt dryness to his voice and then a subtle tone, like there's just something about that that, you know, Quentin Tarantino's like that's that's exactly how feel about it. And he's so good with the kid, too. You're like, what the hell? You expect him to be a total. Monster. Making sandwiches. And they're. Playing guns. And I love. I love the sandwiches. What do you want to? Watch Shogun Assassin. Oh, my God. I think that's so funny that this little girl. What's a lot show good. It's acid. Yeah. Sandwiches are great. The. You know the fish the goldfish parallel. And then he gives them a car that's like a damn near 20 minute monologue. About Superman and Clark. Kent. And it still does works. And you're like, All right, I get it. I don't think this dude. Necessarily would. Know all that. Information. But I love the way that he's delivering it. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. This guy's telling a very, very important story about the history of this family, basically. Right. I don't and I don't know how one does this. I don't know if it's his voice or whatnot. But you're paying attention to every bit of his as much as you're fixated on him, watching him so expertly and precisely cut off the crusts of these sandwiches in the way he slaps on the meat like that scene is amazing. Just because of that, so much should fall away. But doesn't the. Big Kahuna burger. The Big Kahuna Burger. $5 shake. I mean, Jesus, the screwdriver. His favorite needle drop. Kill number, volume one. Yeah mine. So obvious. It's just battle without honor. Humanity, it can't not be like that is it can't be people walking into the house of blue leaves just setting the scene. It's so damn cool. It's also ominous. I mean, there's so many good needle drops in this, but that is that is the one to me. That is the one. And I think that's one of like when I hear that song, I think of not just the movie, but I think of Quentin yeah, like I like that is oh. Absolutely. Purely him. It's like that intro to the Miz. Zulu from. Pulp Fiction as well. Yeah, it's it's it's an iconic thing that's oh, that's pure Quentin Tarantino right there in the song. What about for volume two for you. I went with Summertime Killer by Lewis Back a Love. It's yeah it's. A great one. Where he's coming back to his car Michael Madsen is coming back to his cabin and, yeah, Uma's waiting for him. Is that guitar? Oh, it. Really. Cues up. Yeah, yeah, yeah. That's that's a cool because I picked like a shorter cue as well and it's the chase. The right when the title card Eleni appears and it's just her driving down the road in the convertible to Bud's house. I love that. By Allen Reeves. I love that it's like a minute long. It's love it so much it's great. I know exactly what you're talking about. So now about. Music for yeah, we're taking music. Out of it. Favorite scene or set piece? You go first volume one. I'll go first of all into. My absolute 100% favorite scene of volume one is the animal scene. Oh, really? Yeah. I was expecting that at all. Mine so obvious. It's the crazy 88 fights. I mean, you know, it's like a 15 minute long fight scene. So that one, we can just get that out of the way. So awesome. Well, I did not expect you to say that at all. That is one of the most, like, disturbing, like empathetic, hard to watch, but so cool to watch in a weird way. Part of me wanted like after that scene, I was like, Can we watch the rest of the movie like this? Right. Right. I almost like I sympathize so much. Or if there's so much with Lucy Liu, I was like you. You you got a raw deal. Yeah. You've been. Through it. When the mom gets killed and the blood is soaked through and starts dripping on her here, man, like. Like that's just a detail that's just way too much. And it says. Whimper. And she. Like, puts it. Back in her mouth. Whimper. Oh, I love it. It's so good. It's so good. I'm like, maybe I should see what else is out there. If I like this, this much kind of like what you do when you you're watching like Lee Marvin, like I got to see all these Lee Marvin movies. Maybe I'll get an anime. I mean yeah. Volume two. My favorite scene is it kind of leads. Straight from the chase. To it's the bride. Verse. L in Bud's. Trailer, you know. Just. Over everything. About it. I will. Never forget. The collective gasp. I saw this movie in the. Theater like a lot. Definitely the day it opened. But I kept going with crowds. When we see. What the bride has. To do to win this fight, like, I will just I. Will never forget it. People screaming. In the. Theater. Did you get the. Close up of her stepping. On it? And, oh, we've come a long way from people, like. Losing their minds from Mr. Blond, like not seeing Mr. Blond. Hack off in the year 2000, in 1992, to a woman like plucking another woman's eye out just up in 2000. For like. Come a really long way. I just, you know, it's a great scene. Oh, my God. It's a great scene. I mean, all the fight scenes in these Kill Bill movies are just fucking fantastic. Yeah, no. Way. They're just like Daryl Hannah is, like, flying through the air that they're throwing each other through the. Through the walls. Throw it like a spit on. God, it's great. Oh, yeah. The spit. That's such a specific thing. Right. All right, you're you're going to get a kick out of my favorite scene of this movie. No, God is. The black and white wedding rehearsal scene. No fair. That's the first chapter. Yeah, it's amazing. Yeah, the first chapter when she is just sort of like it wasn't actually a wedding, it was the rehearsal. That's when the movie. If you're watching. It, it's one it turns into a western. Right there because. Does not. You hear that American music start in the way we're. Cutting back when she's walking outside. She hears him. Playing flute. When we're cutting back and forth really, really quick from like him to hurt him to her, to him, to her. That's Sergio. Leone. It's shit that's good. The bad and the ugly shit like. We are turning into a Western right there. And that's. The first time. We see David Carradine's face. And I love that. Exactly. And and we're getting this history, this romantic history that don't talk about like they don't. But you feel it like they dance around what their history is. Right. And I love that she's in my opinion, this is like bozo. Just total bozo total idiot. And he's just like looking at David Carradine, just looking at me. He's like, well, if this is what makes you happy then you know, you've got it. And he's like, I'm only sitting on the bride's side. What's the bride's side? And then, right, because you have no like, you know what's going to happen, but you forget, like I did, like, I completely forgot that there's about to be a massacre. Yeah. Uma Thurman, the bride, does not. Know it's about to happen, but we, as the audience know, like as charming as this dude is. Being right now, he's ordering all these people to their death. Within a matter of seconds. And then when he cuts away and then we get the gang coming up and you're like. Oh, in the media saying. Oh, this is how it's happening right now. I fucking love that scene. I loved all and it's so long. It's a very, very long scene and it's a lot of dialog, but it also mirrors the end. The end is a very, very long drawn out. Yeah. Yeah. And it the violence that happens like when they fight is so sparse it's really them talking. The climax of the movie is the communication, not the fighting, which I thought was a very cool to kind of end that. Well, that's the whole thing is that they set. Up this like we're going to go. Out to the beach it, you know, at. Midnight or whatever, at dawn or dusk. And we're going to have this great fight. And you that's kind of also a staple of these movies. Is that often the final kill? I only know this from watching. I've watched. So many Bruce Lee movies. In the past couple of weeks, that final kill. It's like a video game. Like getting up to the boss is usually the boss just becomes so, like, petrified. You're like, Holy shit, how do you make it this far? And then it's kind of and just it's like, Oh my God, I don't know. Let's get that to do this, boss. That's a lot of shit. I defend myself. Well, I'm not as good as I thought it was again. Like, it's because we're covering. We could literally do. A. Ten part series. And have two hour episodes dedicated to each of these movies. But that's part of the exercise of doing this and believe me, folks, this episode does not mean this. Last summer ever talking about. These movies. Or, you. Know, there could be commentaries, it could be anything like it's Tarantino, baby. Tarantino. Kill Bill, influence. I've talked about this one way back. On our favorite films from. 19. 73. What a memorable. Episode that was. But I only briefly. Mentioned Lady Snow, Blood, a Japanese film from 19. 73. And yeah, if people. Think Reservoir Dogs is. Too close to City on. Fire. Kill Bill, Volume one like is Lady Snow Blood. I mean, he had the cast. And crew. On the set of Kill Bill watching scenes from Lady Snow Blood. I mean, they're just wholesale things that Tarantino lifts. From it, particularly. The beginning. And honestly, the. End is very similar to certain. Aspects of the House of Blue Leaves, including the production design. But shots, costumes. Chapter breaks, editing structures, freeze frames, character introductions. It's all. Pretty, pretty damn similar to. Kill Bill I'll just say that. And the language that was being used in Lady Snow Blood, which is on. HBO right now, I just rewatched. It two days ago and had a great time. It's a very similar language. To Kill Bill. It's like Revenge from birth. I love the birth revenge. Movie like you. Were. Conceived just to avenge people who did awful shit. To your mother. It's a great way to start a movie. Game of Death in 1970. Nine starring Bruce Lee. That's where they got the. Influence to have that yellow track jumpsuit. That Uma Thurman wears. Shogun assassin, which is. Referenced. So heavily in Volume two, just by having Bebe want to see it. And then I like all the spaghetti westerns we kind of. Reference that will. Become. Way more apparent late in his later work, but. He's using a lot of that in kill bill volume two. But if you are a fan of Kill. Bill and want to see the influence, Lady Snow Blood, I mean I genuinely think he like took some of the the sounds. That are. Lady snowboard and like use them in kill bill just the sounds of like fighting and chopping and killing. I'm serious. Like, I don't know. It's very, very similar. You should also point out this is the first collaboration between cinematographer Robert Richardson and. Cut. Nice cut. Yes, very true. He in that time off, like there is this. There are. Changes taking place throughout his body. Of work. Like he's getting a little more money every time. Now he. Moves over to Robert Richardson. And we are seeing his movies move in a way they did. Not before. I love. The long takes in. His first three films. I do, but we have that. We have not spent any of our time today talking about like the lighting of one of those scenes, the first film. That's okay. But Robert Richardson. The king of hot white light, he'll just have that like, oh, beam and down on you like that hot, hot light. And yes, you're right. He has shot. Every. Subsequent. Tarantino film and been nominated for a lot of Oscars for Tarantino. Never won some. He's won some for other movies. But yeah, that's. We're seeing a. Huge. Photographic difference begin here. Well, I should say. Not every. Subsequent movie because he didn't shoot the next one. But yes, essentially. And all of them like all of his movies up until he meets Richardson while is the cinematography is great because it's all intentional and it's all very very well done. But it does not have that signature staple that Richardson gives because every single one of his movies, you're like, Oh, they all look a very specific way and move a certain way. And, and that's and that's, that's, that's went in from here on out except for this next movie, right? That if you don't mind, I'm going to introduce please, because I cannot tell you how much fun I had with this movie upon this rewatch. Yeah. Oh, so. You didn't rewatch this for our 20. Seven part? No, I know. I never got to this. Oh I watch Planet. Terror and Death for it. Back to back. Yeah, set it up. So I want to hear this shit. I love this fucking movie. I have, truth be told, not seen death proof since I saw it in theaters in 2007 as a part of Grindhouse with Planet Terror. Right. And to be honest, I was so floored with Planet Terror because I really, really liked it that when we got to death proof, I wasn't giving death proof enough of my attention. Maybe because it was the second movie, maybe my and kind of gone. Honestly, what I remembered the most about the whole entire movie was the car chase. Oof! That was my last point of view of that movie until three days ago, where I had the time of my fucking life watching this fucking movie. I had so. Much, you know, this, that all. I mean, we'll see where it stands and my ranking of it. Well, hold on, hold on. So how did you watch this? Did you, like, rent it on? Is it available on. Streaming or do you own it? It was on the Roku channel. My point is, this is so this is. The first time you're seeing the longer cut like two hour 53 minute cut. Because in the theaters as. Grindhouse. It was about 80 minutes. I'm going to get to this. But okay, so this is just interesting. So you're literally. Like. You literally. Just watch aspects of a Tarantino. Movie for the first time, which is pretty. Cool. Yes. And I had to end up watching it, which is, oh, people are going to hate this. I had to watch it on my phone because. I don't hate that it was I'm a fucking junkie. I watched so many movies on my phone. I take them anywhere I can get them folks. Anyway, I do not care. I do not care. And one of the best parts because I rarely ever do that. But watched them with my, my, my earbuds. And that's exactly why I like watching them on my phone. I keep interrupting you. But I'm sorry. You hear so much fucking sound. You hear so much. So much. I just from the second it started, I loved that the first set of girls. Oh by the time. That we meet fucking Kurt Russell. Oh, my God. So now we could talk about the nachos. The fucking. Not just the baby. He makes it look so good. And he's such a slob. Having a bit about. Yeah. Stuntman Mike in one sitting has made it to a very high echelon of favorite Tarantino characters. Stuntman Mike I love Kurt fucking Russell. I never get a chance to talk about how much I love this guy. He is one of my all time favorite character type actors in this movie. He gets to show so many sides of him utterly creepy, dangerous. Charming. Then he's also charming. Like that scene where like when he sits down to tell her, like to whisper, to recite the poem, to get the lap dance. Yeah, it's awkward when he sits down because everyone knows what he's about to do and he's shooting his shot and it comes off creepy at the start. But then somewhere along the way he manages to make it charming, but then goes off into like a well, when I was a young whipper, like, was like whatever. That kind of like tone that. He goes in. Russell loves this John Wayne accent. He did cover up the whole movie where he got. To do it for the for the entire. Movie. And I love it. I love you, Kurt. Well, I got up well. I got book. Right. And everyone I meet goes, Yeah, that's right, your name. Is going in it. But unfortunately I didn't. I didn't expect this at all. Thought because I can't, because I can't remember the 80 minute version. But the only the only thing that I would say, like if I felt a certain lull in the movie would have been in the second in the diner scene with with the main girls that some of that conversation gets a little repetitive. They actually say the same thing twice. That is, he was a little up his own ass. They're like. Yeah, you see, I love you, but you shot the movie yourself. You're the credited cinematographer. That's all one take. And it's very well done. You have them revolving around. We catch stuntman Mike. In the background, which is very, very. Cool. The first time in the theater you're just. Hanging on. The edge of every word. But when you go back for subsequent. Rewatches, it's like, okay, ladies, like, I. Know where all this is. Going. Like, I don't know if it needs to take this long to get there. No. The main thing in like the whole scene with them at the gas station and he like. Tries to rub one of their feet. And then it. Switches from black to color. Nothing that. Is in the original. And then the like. Okay, that's. The last dance. Lasts for like 30. Seconds and then it comes up and says. Missing frames. It's like. Like the frame. Fades out. It's like frames missing. So it's a lot of it's like cuts like that. But that was the bulk of my remarks. And for the 27 pod was that this was an amazing theatrical experience because yeah, it was really billed as like the Grindhouse experience. It was in the sold out crowd was into it in. The Grindhouse version. Each film. Was they were about. 80 minutes long and you had a bunch of. Cool fake trailers. Some of which had. Been actually turned into real movies. Machete Yeah. And had like promos before. And during the double feature when it premieres when death proof careers at. Con. And a little later on home. Video. Kuti presents an extended version of the. Film, which is the one you just watch. And it's about. Like 113. Minutes long. And they're two pretty different experiences. Like the final. Astounding chases. Untouched and both. But there are cuts. Made to the dialog that I appreciated in the. In the shorter version. Now it's so funny because you. Literally just teed. Me up to like the point I had to make, which is that I love death proof as a standalone film, I love it as a double. Feature. But there is. A little of, Hey, look what I can do next to the movie. And I like that he shot it himself because I the scenes. In the bar are very like they're pretty harshly over lit on everyone's. Is. Very uncommon for Tarantino's. Movies. Very common for Grindhouse. Movies of the sixties and seventies. This is it's like this is how they looked and then God, I love the second batch of ladies, like just tough ladies who could kick some ass and have fun. It's really my kind. Of show I made. Oh, my God. And love when you know, because, like, it's such a satisfying feeling when because, you know, Kurt Russell is just this woman killing maniac that when he gets shot and he's hurt. Well, he's, like, wailing, like a little girl, like he's like, no, no, no. And he's just take that whiskey to the face and he goes, Do it, just do it. And he pours. It all over himself. I mean, yeah, when you're watching it go like, wait a minute, I supposed to be laughing here just feeling. The crowd in the theater, turn. With him and being like, We're just all laughing hysterically at him. Oh, what a great turn. You don't expect it. And it's such a great performance from to to go from the guy who can basically for simple terms, the guy who can dish it out but can't take. Yep, yep. And it and to being a little tiny baby boy who gets hurt with a booboo and doesn't, you know, it's just it's perfect and maybe I missed it in the in the original cut, but, like, when they're all punching him, I really wanted a satisfying death. Like, I wanted something of the like that we had seen from the other deaths in the movie. And I guess I missed Rosario Dawson is like the heel. To the face he. Runs she like gives his head. Yeah, yeah. I missed that apparently the first time because like it. Happens after it says the end. So you may have like, you know, start packing up or like talking. With who you're or something. Like that. Yeah, but it missed. It's a cruncher goes right down there. Because I felt like I needed that. I need, like, just for them to punch Malaga. Well, is he dead? They just punch him dead, like, or is he just like they just beat him up and then he's going to get up. But like, I needed a a a solid death. And it wasn't until I saw that this time I go, Oh, she just caved his face in, you. Know, and also in this. Movie rocks, you know, when he crashes into the first. Set of women, that's not special effects. That's all. Real. That's all. I mean, they're dummies, obviously. Like, so that girl really goes, Oh, you. Guys fucking asshole. I didn't kill Cindy Poitier's daughter. Name is Sidney Poitier. You just smell. I love Michael Parks. I can damn. Sure. Guarantee it ain't going to be in Texas. And then we just got to Tennessee thing. Oh, that's. Great. All right. Favorite character. Do we need to call it out? Should we take a guess? It's stunt man, my man Mike. Who's stunt man? Mike. Stunt man, yes. Tear it. Tito's really going for it acting wise. And this he kind of seems like he had. A few drinks before. It seems. Like he's. He's really dialed up here. Like. Yeah, let's see it already. Did he, like, put people on his lap? It's like you're. Dude, come. On, Warren. Yeah, like, this. Is one of those ones where I was like, Anthony, you're just. You're just really feeling your. I roll, too. Yeah, it's all. It's all like. Yeah, they're all really going for it. But when he closes that. Door on Rose. And he just looks at us, looks, looks at the camera and smiles, I was like, I mean, that's my. That's probably my favorite. Like 5 seconds of the movie. He's like, Yeah, I fucking. Yeah, outer and. You all are. Yeah enjoy this and and we got to give a little credit. We've been talking about it, but like how quickly he turns like to be actually. Afraid of him. You're like. What is he about to do to this girl in this car? Like, Oh, yeah, yeah. This is going to be. Oh, so, so good. And the craziest thing about that scene is like that, that might be like the most vicious, violent moment of any of his movies, because there's just a reality to being in a very small, enclosed space with nothing but metal. And then all he's doing is whipping the car around. And then you're just like, That's just it. That's terrifying. We talk about this a lot in the podcast movie. Violence versus Realistic. Violence. Movie violence is then beating up at the end. And it's like all these. Yeah, just boom. Boom, boom. Realistic violence is what he does. To pour Rose McGowan. In that car. Yeah. You just like feel that in the final hitting the break. Oh God it's. Just oh this the sound is just incredible. But my question really quick is maybe I missed this in the Michael Parks like explanation of everything after the accident or the accident, the murders. Oh, so she was in the car. It's like bloodied up in his car when he crash. Yeah. So yeah, I get like because the whole entire thing is like, well, the two like, like is a head on collision. So, you know, you chalk that up, but like, how do you explain the complete like blood and body of Rose McGowan and. He's like kind of putting it. Together. But he goes, you know. The dude has a broken collarbone like, we have nothing to charge him with because. He was. Sober. They were all drunk, they had liquor in their system. He was driving one girl. Home and he kind of sets it. Up like, well, the drunk girls. Hit me. Oh, like I was just driving. I was driving this lady. Everyone at the bar knows I was sober. Hey, I. Just. I carried a weights. I was just escorting. The nice lady home. These drugs. That's right. And it. Hit me. So, like. If there's an accident and all that happens to her in that car. That's that's the that's why he has to stay sober. That's the whole. Point. Michael Stewart is, full of shit. He's like, now there's this is fishy, but if he does this again, I'm going. To make sure it. Ain't gonna be in Texas. And yeah, okay. So it's like passing the buck off, like goes on up to Tennessee for a new batch of ladies. I love this. Like, deep dove on death proof. I had no idea that was coming. Yeah. I had so much fun with it. I also really low. Key love the soundtrack and I have owned oh yeah one. Of these soundtracks but favorite deal drop you. Know I love even beginning with just the. Last race. But yeah Jesus it's hold tight by. David Yeah. Dozy Beaky Mick and titch I love it so much. That's just. That's my. Favorite. And I love the way that they shoot it too, because you see each one of the deaths and it's all when he when he gets these, like, cuts to, like, turning the light on, it's like so, you know, I mean it really you're just saying, okay, watch this person die. Watch this person die. Here's another one. Well, what's worse, the legs being split. Apart or. Getting up the. Tire to the. Face. That's it's it's a there are tough ways to go. And he really well, he just gets it. There for. It. I feel like the tire in the face happy like you'll die a lot faster with the tire to the face. I would hope so. All right. Well, your favorite needle drop, though. The same the same hole. Oh, yeah, it's got to be. Yeah. There's also music. In here from Blow out from Dario Argento. Movies. It's it's just, you know, it's all paying homage. It's all it is. Yeah. Favorite scene set piece. It's the final chase, baby. It's the 26 minutes of that final chase bass. Basically, for me, it's the moment when stuntman Mike spots them with his. Binoculars and. Smiles to the end. Card at the. End. Those are 26 minutes of old school gearheads. May think I'm an idiot for. Saying this, but I see the stakes of Bullitt. The French connection. The seven ups, and I see that it was. A little more serious. Because, like, people could have actually died. Making the French Connection. Like lunatics the way they did it like that. But the audaciousness of this death proof scene, like he's clearly doing it intentionally, clearly. Going for broke. There's no special effects, no computer tricks. It's all in-camera. It's a lot of fun watching the shit. I love. It. And I'm glad you picked that because I picked something different. Wow. Okay, cool. No, that's great. That's great. I'm doing the same thing you did where it's like from the from the period of time where we are introduced to Kurt Russell eating the nachos at the bar until that last like scene where everyone's dead. Yeah, well, except for him, that whole entire sequences so good. I was on the edge of my seat with everything I've loved. That was. That was one of my favorite movie watching experiences I've had in a long time. Oh, it's also that scene sequence I was this. I'm like, This is all great. This is all just fantastic stuff. And I'll tell you, I didn't know what the hell he was talking about in. That bar when he's referencing all. Those shows. I thought Tarantino was just making that up. No, it's all there. Like, that's that's the genesis of, like, once upon a Time in Hollywood. Like this guy, this young man talking. About, you know, the Virginia. And then he pauses and he's like, Do you have any idea what I'm talking about? And they don't. And now I know all those shows, but it's just there it is. You're seeing those seeds of like I like these stuntmen. Who were in the business for a. While. Yeah. Because now at the age that we're at, I feel like that when I'm talking to young people, I'm like, Do you guys have any idea who the fuck this is? Okay, all right. All right. I'm talking to. All it's a lot of fun to be asked. Hey, what was 911 like, isn't it? It's a lot of fun. Yes. So I just raced true story. It's happened to. Me, too. Trust me. It's happening to me. Oh, my God. Well, my favorite story influence is Bullitt. 1968 is huge. Fan Vanishing Point, released in 1971. They are referencing it. Extensively because of the 1970 Dodge Challenger. It's in death proof. And that vanishing point was a ton of fun. It's just it's an. Hour, 40. Minute long chase scene and then. Dirty Mary, Crazy Larry from 1974, another car movie that Tarantino is really influenced by had a lot of fun rewatching those. Now we're coming up to a real big turning. Point, fun time is. Over and we're getting into history. We're getting into revisionist history. Inglourious Basterds, 2009. I just don't think people. Were really ready. For movie, honestly, in hindsight, because in 2000. Nine, the reception for this was. It was good, but it wasn't what he expected and it wasn't how people talk about it now, because some people loved this, a lot of people did not get it. But I. Think in the 13 years since this has been released. We've seen q t continue to. Rewrite history in. His films. And we understand now what he was doing with the end of. Inglourious Basterds, because. In 2009, a lot of people. Were not ready for. This ending and they possibly didn't understand that a. World War Two. Nazi. Hunter movie. Could begin like Hitchcock, but end in sublime fantasy. Well, this is the first time that he really started to explore fantasy. Yeah. In in terms of history, like, he's only really done this with once Upon a Time in Hollywood, which I actually think a little bit were Django. And Django. There was there were slave revolts. But not like blown up to fucking house, you know, like. Yeah, it's a bit of revisionist history there. Yeah, yeah, yeah. But this was all fantasy. Yes. This is all just we're going to take what if, like there were like. Yeah, basically that's what he's asking. What if what if we're not going by the way it went? What if we're just saying what if? Right. And I think in so many ways, it's in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. Are the Quentin Tarantino most true as to who he is? Oh, interesting. I think. This movie. It has everything about him. He has fun playing with chapters in that way. He has fun playing with time. The way that he moves flash around. It's asking that fantasy question with history and then it's also still throwing out all of these odes. Moviemaking. Oh yeah. The fact that he has Mélanie Laurent working in a movie theater and then the whole entire plot to kill Hitler is in a movie theater, right. Where else would Quentin Tarantino ever try to? Of course, other than a movie theater? So, like, this movie has him all over it in way that doesn't really feel like it does. It's a different version. Of Q because now he is the master making. Masterpieces. He's still using his influence is because you can't watch. Inglourious Basterds without seeing very deliberate parallels to something like The Dirty. Dozen. But Inglourious Basterds is a lot fancier than. His earlier work, the camerawork, is getting stronger. He's not relying. So heavily on pop music. The dialog is. Way more intricate. I mean, we're not just making way. Yeah, we're not just making hilarious. Pop culture references and arguing. About foot massages. Anymore, where we're. Playing a cat and mouse game. With words like. I know what you have under these. Floorboards. Motherfucker. And I knew. Before my men drove me up your driveway. I'm just going to go. On this verbal. Volley to get you to know how serious I am by it. And, you know, I know your accent is weird. Michael Fassbender. I know something is wrong. By the way, you use. Words by. Your accent. By the way, you hold. Up three fingers. Like this is all. Very intricate and brilliant. And it's his most mature movie. You think so? See, I think it's. I would still it's Jackie Brown is his most. Mature but I've heard. People okay. I've heard. People say that. For Jackie Brown bastards and. Hollywood but bastards to me has a little too much playfulness at the end to call it like a fully, fully. Mature experience. And there's some, you know, shag. As you. Know, there is. Gore. Alamy, Gore. Lami. Gore all enjoyed. Was still playful because they're like, oh, you talked about like he's fun. Like this is this is who he is as a filmmaker. Yes, he is. He is going to make us have fun with whatever. But there is a level of intelligence that's being exuded now that in just the dialog, this is real, real stuff. And they're not using his harsh language. They're being a little bit more intelligent with the way that they're insulting each other, the way that they put it. Yet all still feels like his dialog. Yeah, it's like I don't speak Italian. Like I said, their best. Keep your fucking mouth shut. Like, that's a great. Yeah, yeah, great. Just a great line. We're going to talk about Oscars. We're going to do a whole. Section down the line. But I do think that the fact that he lost best. Best original screenplay to The Hurt Locker. For this was just silly. I don't know. I didn't necessarily think that in 2009. But like. The verbal. Ingenuity of. This screenplay. Of the. Bastard screenplay is really superior to just. Anything else that. Was written in. 2009. And it's like, you know. Hurt Locker got picture and director that's. Fine. This should have been Tarantino's award. This is 100% have been this is yeah I think it's so. Weird. Honestly it's. A little weird. It has everything. It's I mean he's got different languages going. He's, he's so authentic to the. Languages, four different. Languages that are speaking that are being spoken fluently. There's like English, German. French, Jesus. And, and the characters are represented through the dialog, the creativity of just doing something like this. I'd never anything like it. I had never seen someone make a complete fantasy World War two scenario. Yeah. About trying to kill Hitler. Like, that's. It's just that this didn't win. I don't know if, like, anyone had. I think that's maybe when I say I don't. Know if everyone was ready for it. I think. That's it's kind of like it's it's a little hard to find someone is like no other movies dog shit. Now or didn't really do it for me I heard a. Lot of I didn't really. Do it for me. In 2009, but I don't know. I'm not saying the movie has. To be for everyone, but I just think it's a really, really well-made. Movie. And let's move right on to favorite character. This is a tough one, but I don't know how often a brutal Nazi is. My favorite character in the film, but here we are because mine. Is a Hans Landa played by Christoph Waltz, which I think is just some of the best casting and best acting of that decade. I'll leave it there a. Tremendously deserved. Best Supporting Actor Oscar win here. Jesus, I. I you said it all. That's exactly my sentiment. Like I think of J.K. Simmons a lot when I think of best supporting actor for Whiplash and and and Christoph Waltz are like two of like when I when the who's your favorite, like best supporting actor for an Academy Award, especially in the last, like, you know, 22 years. Like I've like these two. Yeah, yeah. I mean, I've a bunch that's always. Been one of my favorite awards. Like Benicio for Traffic is. I mean, yeah, there's a lot, but those are two ways that they. Really, really got it right. I also just a shout out to Lieutenant. Archie. Hickox. You know, British commando and former film critic played. By Michael Fassbender. He's just three scenes and he kills it. Shut up. Right after hunger, right around. Fish. Tank, right before shame. Beautiful timing. Great casting. Here's something. For you. Did you know this? Did you know that this. Poor dude. Audition. For Landa. Like, five times? Oh, really? Yep. Michael Fassbender. Did. And they went with Christoph Waltz. That's a. Tough break. I mean, he gave him this part, which is good, but it's not like. Fassbinder could not have handled Hans Landa. But there's no one better than waltz for it. There's just not. That's just one of those decisions where it was like, Oh, yes, the right one. He did it right. Favorite needle drop. This is interesting. Well, tell me yours first, because there's there's a controversial. Song in. Here. And if that. Isn't your pick, then we'll talk about that last. The song in particular, I'm going with cat people. Okay? Yeah. Like David Bowie. Yeah, yeah. We'll talk about that in a sec. My favorite musical. Moment in the movie. Ennio Morricone original score from a different movie. But when he goes, this just might be. My masterpiece like. That. And it na na yeah and I love that so much but yes cat people putting out fire by David Bowie. This is one of the biggest. Flexes of Tarantino's career. Because this whole movie has been, like, grounded in. Sort of. Reality up into this point. Of a time period. Of a time period. And the first time you see. Inglourious Basterds. When this song comes on, it takes you out. It's designed to I think that's why he Shoshana. Getting ready for such. A long time, because it's like he wants you to settle in and go. David Bowie's music was not around in World War Two. Kuti knows we this. So he. Wants you to strap in for. Something way. Way different. Because this ain't your grandfather's World War Two movie. It's great. The other needle, literally, it's a needle drop moment is I love when they introduce Hugo Stiglitz for the first time. And it just. Gives you like those guitar chords come in with the complete over-the-top font for his name because we don't see with. Anybody else. Right, right. Again, this is Quentin Tarantino having fun and if you don't get it again, you just get it in that one moment and it's fucking great. Til Schweiger. I'm sorry if I didn't. Pronounce that right. I don't know if. You know about him, but he's an. Actor who. Said when. He started acting. He would. Never, ever play a. Nazi like it just because he's. Born in Germany and he's like. It's not what I want my acting career to be. And this was the only one. He'd do it like a Nazi who kills other Nazis. When they put, they put like a pillow over the guy's face. He's just stabbing it. You're like, Holy shit. Oh, my God. It's one of my favorite, like, violent movie moments of the whole movie. Oh, yeah. He's a great actor, though. I love him. Scene or speech. God, this is hard. I just. Let me hear yours first. It's always. It's me. It's down to two. Yeah, it's the card playing scene. It's the whole entire 15 minute undercover card scene where they get found out. That's just, to me, some of the most genius. I mean, I could say the same thing about the opening scene, though. It's just some of the most genius situation you can put characters in, have amazing writing to support it, and then have it play out the way that it does. Both those scenes do that expertly. Well, let's start there. How'd you like that, motherfucker? I like it. You just learned how to speak English. That's great. You're called yourself out of your buddy. I didn't call you out. I edited out every version. Of you mispronouncing that word. Apparently for you, mad movie buffs. I've this entire time we've had this podcast, I say that, I say expertly. And yet I'm leaving it. It's out for yourself. Out? Yeah. I'm sorry. I was. Because, you know. That's not a word. You keep saying this. I think you mean expertly. Expertly is not a word. Yeah, but what I did, I took like ten examples of you doing it. All the podcasts that I edited to get her to back up. And it set you that every three days was like, Hey, babe, this is it. A word I think. You mean to say. Expertly. And then your reply was, Fuck you, I remember this very well. It just said, Fuck you. And I went, All right. Well, if you if you want to sound like an idiot on the podcast, that's what I told you. I said, okay, based on that response, next time you say it, I'm not editing out. So there anyway, Inglourious Basterds, great. Scene in the bar. You said it's a meeting in a fucking basement. Yeah, the turns of that. Brad Pitt. We haven't even mentioned. Fucking Brad Pitt yet. We're talking about glorious bastards. I know. Terrible. I mean, the way that he goes, you know, guns. We know guns. You you really think he's going to let that guy go? They just, you know. The poor guy is. Blown away, but it's so. Great. And Mélanie Laurent. Oh, God, I said she's. Well, she I love her. I love her so much. Well she's on in that scene. That's Diane. Kruger. No, I'm just saying over. Okay. In general. Oh my God. I never seen her before. She's so good. My favorite scene is the opening conversation because. Yeah. When the movie begins, the opening. Frames. Of this. Movie are a direct. Homage to the opening. Frames of Unforgiven. By Clint Eastwood, a. Filmmaker, an Tarantino really loves. Unforgiven was made as an homage to Don SIEGEL, one of like five. Directors that have been. The most influential. On Tarantino. And, you know, it's just too in Landa and La Petite, they sit down. From the moment the shots rang out like. That, that whole section, it has be one of the top five best. Alfred. Hitchcock sequences that Hitchcock. Never. Filmed, because. It's just so thrilling to. See the see them. Sit there. They're chatting this big pipe. You're like, There's milk. What's going on? Let me go under those floorboards. And that's when it. Changes from a thrilling. Scene to, a suspenseful scene, because we know that something else is going. On here and we're just counting these dreadful. Minutes until it happens. And it is absolutely remarkable. It is it's one of the best opening scenes of any movie ever. Yeah, it really is. This is a guy who knows how to nails opening scenes and this is one of them influence. Is really quick. We mention. The Dirty. Dozen to be or not to be. 1942 by Ernst. Lubitsch. It's there's a lot of the discussing. Movies romance. Aspect that was a big influence for him in making this. I hadn't seen it. Before researching this and. It was a lot of fun to go back and watch it. I like his movies a lot. Lubitsch Any relation? The bar in West Hollywood called Bar? Lubitsch That's literally who it's named after. Nicholas Good, good. That's good. We have some fun times that are cool. West Hollywood sure did that. Back room I didn't know about for. Well, that sounds more nefarious and it did go on. The back or things in the back. Room so I'm saying, is it still around? Yeah, it is. So there. Yeah. No, that place. Sweaty, sweaty. We. Oh, baby Django. Here we go. Django Unchained 2012. I had a really. Good time rewatching this movie. For this. Episode. I was a little honestly, I was the most forgiving of it than. I ever. Have been. And it's not like I've. Never disliked. This movie, but it's it is his. Epic Western with Western landscapes. It's very long, it's episodic. When he decides, like it's interesting when he decides to split his movies into actual chapters, like with Kill. Bill, Inglourious Basterds, The. Hateful Eight and when not I don't know pre. DiCaprio. Pre Calvin Candie it's all set up once. DiCaprio comes. Into this. Movie. There is a fury. That is injected into this thing that. Really just propels it forward. I've always liked this movie, but in in the ten. Years since when I've rewatched. I, I don't know, I just had a little bit. More of like a critical ear. To it. I don't I don't know why, like. Kind of dragging. A little bit once we meet Leo, we. Cook for the rest of the time. And I'm watching it now and I'm like, Well, we meet him. Like an hour into the movie. Like, the hour I just watch was fine. Like, chill out, dude, it's. A great. Movie and I'm just real quick, another thing of like giving a little. More credit where it's deserved. That like when all those idiot KKK. Morons storm that. In the music, that piece of classical music is going off. I mean, yeah, when he shoots that dude off. The horse and like the. Blood, you know, we see it boom. On the on the. Flowers, the white flowers. This just amazing, amazing shit. This was my favorite movie of the use of blood. I like the way. That like it's like it's like it's like a single fountain that just shoots up. And it has a sound. Yeah, it has that sound to it. I remember. I just like, is the first time someone got shot and that's the way you see the blood. I go, okay, we haven't seen this. We've seen fountains draw out, like spew out and kill bill. We've seen puddles of it in Reservoir Dogs and but we've never seen like these, like gulps of it like come out. And I was just sort of like, all right, cut. This is you're doing it this time. I suppose this is about the the point where I was going to bring up a controversial topic. Chris Heron It's something that he uses a lot. I figured we were going to get to it at some point. The use of the N-word. Yeah, yeah, okay. Okay. It's a I'm so I mean, you know, people listen to movies and make us cry. Like I'm very, very. Very sensitive to this stuff. So, yeah, I don't I. Don't really. Know how to. Rationalize or explain or argue for him. On this. The only thing I'll say about this that this. Is a slavery movie. So I understand the context of it. It got a lot of heat at the time, even though it's. A slavery movie. A lot of heat. But this this was not new to Django Unchained. And we all know this. It's like Reservoir Dogs uses the line five times and it's all wildly inappropriate. Every time they use it, it's this is why it can. Be hard. To kind of go back and you're watching like, ooh, ooh that didn't. You notice it really. Didn't really didn't need to be. There. Dialog he gives himself in pulp fiction that never needed to be there I was watching that 1995 going ooh ooh. That was yeah. Yeah, that's weird. It didn't enjoy Icky Brown. He's kind of giving himself the excuse of, well, this is it's all Samuel Jackson and that's how these characters talk. And that's when Spike. Lee versus Tarantino. Becomes the thing is, Spike Lee's like, okay, what's going on? But, you know, as much as he may. Try to defend. Himself from being like, Well, I. Have a right to write how authentic characters. Talk gets lot. Of heat for Jackie Brown and then the word goes away from for Kill Bill for Inglourious Basterds. I'm not sure about death proof, honestly. Django Unchained, the words said one and ten times. A lot of fucking. Times to hear my least favorite word. A lot. Hateful eight is. Eighth. It's even more so more sexual. It's like four. It's 47. I only know this because I looked I look this up, but hateful. Eight slugs, they're really just talking about one person. Samuel Jackson. They're like, Jesus Christ, guys. So but they just go back and forth and. They even bring it out. Like, if you keep using that word, I'm going to kick you out of this. But yes, with Django Unchained, it is it's the. Biggest curse word of the movie. I think Suck is said like 29 times and then that. Word said 110. Times. It's it's the hardest aspect of the. Movie for me it's. And I think that's yeah, I knew this was going to. Get brought up. I had a I had a. Plan to bring it up. I think it should be brought up. I think it's important to bring this up. I think it's important to mention it. It said zero times and once upon a time in Hollywood, I just I think we're seeing. That there are. If you want to use language like this, there are. Other ways. To go. There's any number of words, you know, use your words. It doesn't just have to be this, especially. You're a white writer. It's all I'm saying. I get to your writing black characters. I get it. But can we can we move on? Can we just come. Up with different words from here on out like I'm it's. Always, always had. It's like it just feels like it's like a little jab, like, oh, we didn't need to go there. And I get this from my parents. My parents are. Saying this from birth for me. That. There are certain words you don't need to go there for and you don't need to go there here. So that's, that's my thoughts on it. But yeah, it is a it's so egregious in Django Unchained, it just feels like that was his point to belittle, to let you feel like how these people must have felt. I mean, it's it's like people saying. The word man. Like, what's up, man? That's how often it said Stand up. That's that's the way it's used. Yeah. Yeah. But I mean, yeah, it's it's a thing. It's a thing. And he's taken a lot of fucking heat. For it over his career. A lot. And you know what, you know what? You brought it all on your own. You wrote this shit yourself. Yes, that's true. So it's on. You wrote it. And I'm not defending you because I can't. I can't. No. Yeah, we can't. But but it's something that I think just need to be brought up. If we're talking about his movies in the same way, it's like, you know, like in the beginning, like, you know, where, where this is homage versus stealing. You know, this is one of those things where it's just it's just we had to talk about it. Yeah. I mean, I showed my wife. Reservoir Dogs because I wanted her I wanted to show her all the Tarantino. And it it said five times and it's it's just always like wildly unneeded. And she she, like, flinches when she. Years and she's. Like, oh yeah, yeah. You wonder sometimes why black people don't like to watch. You know, older movies? Because this word is just being fucking thrown around. Like. Like it's no big deal, and it has no effect and no impact. And you know? Yeah, perspective. Perspective. But it is a slavery movie. I get it. That's his excuse. But itself. Damn, it's hard. It's like every other word in this fucking movie. Jesus. Now where does this land for you in terms of Leo performances? So I think he's. Incredibly, incredibly strong in this to the point where this. Was a huge I mean, we talked about this in the In. The Departed. Commentary. I was seeing him kind of come around. Revolutionary Road was honestly the first one where I was like, that was the first one where. He's kicking it up here. But this was. Just an extension of that. I love that. It is a it's a movie. Star part in a supporting performance. And I loved it. He took that. I mean, he comes in late and, you know. His character isn't around till the end. Of the movie. I'll just put it that way. You know. There's. He's. Not in it for the whole. Thing and you cannot forget him and I. Yeah. We'll get to. We'll talk more about him as we get to the categories. But yeah. What do you think of him. I think so. I mean, I haven't like. Rated it. But it would be my top five. Leo Yeah. I would have to. Oh man. That would be such a great question to come up with with our favorite Leo performances. But yeah, I remember, I remember watching it and being such fan of his, knowing that he was in it, knowing he was playing the type of character that he was playing. I was like, Oh man, in a Quentin Tarantino movie, what is he going to do? Right? And he didn't disappoint like he he manages to make a very despicable person, someone that you enjoy watching, which I think is like the biggest testament to, that character. It's like, all right, is this really easy? It almost in the way of like the you know, to compare like Fassbender in in 12 Years a Slave like that's. Just evil incarnate. They're evil. And can't just be. Evil and can't. And that's the point. That's the point. You know, and this is to watch someone who and a different level of evil but at the same time you kind of like love to hate. Well, he has a very luxe southern flair and we are having. Yeah, like there's some he enjoys being a gentleman and there's this and that. Fassbinder I mean, you. Know, he's just he's off, he's just gone. He's like, yeah. He's just off. Yeah. Jeez, I love the turnaround where he realizes that he's been duped this entire time because everything changes and we don't get a chance to see Leo be Sinister. Not up until this point. Right? Right. He never necessarily pose in his work threatening level. Oh, I thought you meant at this point in the performance. No, this is like the first like deeply sinister. I mean that I. Can think of that he played. He played definitely. Yeah. You know, he played shifty characters. But this is a guy who's just. Like no redeemable. Quality. There's just not there's no redeemable quality. That's guy. Yeah. Yeah. The one thing I want to say is we have been talking a lot about violence. And I, I think the dog mauling of D'Artagnan is the most violent thing Cutty has. Ever put on screen. And I think, honestly, that he. May agree with. Me and you know. Think because I've heard him talk. About that scene, thank God. He barely shows it. But he was very clear about. Distinguishing between the two types of violence in the. Movie. There is. Violence against slaves, which is. Incredibly. Realistic and. Very. Difficult to watch. And then the almost. Absurd. Over-The-Top. Violence that we're referring to. Against the slave. Owners. But moreover, it's the. Way. The D'Artagnan murder. Haunts Dr. King. SCHULTZ Like, yeah, it's really something we haven't seen in a cute movie before. Like. People die and then you just you move on like I. Shot Marvin in the face. Shit. Like, it's just, Oh, what do we do to fix this? But this is like, he's really contemplating. The horrific. Effects of this violence, and that itself leads to. More violence because we're in a Tarantino. Movie. But you can really. Tell that Schultz is just it pains him to think about it. And that is what leads to the. Rest. Of the film, essentially. Yeah. Yeah. So that's the last kind of big scene I want to talk about. All right. Favorite Characters for you to go with. I'm going to go is something probably Christoph Waltz. Oh, wow. I went with Mr. Candy so we're right. Interesting. Christoph was. Okay here's the thing about Christoph Waltz though not his fault. Is this. A starring performance or is. This a. Supporting performance. Like should he be. An up there for best actor or should he been up there for best supporting actor. Because he's in the movie a lot and I'm not taking anything away from him, but it almost feels like a co-lead to me. But no. He's a great character. Great. I would actually say that he is a co-lead because yeah, I mean, Django is the star. Like what Schultz needs is from him. But in terms of how everything is designed, he's the one coming up with the plan. He's the one who is telling him how to do everything. What he says goes. I would have put him in a co-lead along Jamie Fox because they share the screen all the time. Yeah, yeah. That's what I like. They ride horses together. They do everything like it's and because he also already won four for a supporting lead to win back to back. We're going to talk about all this right now. Yeah we'll talk that but but nonetheless it is my favorite performance of the movie. I think he's absolutely perfect. Yes. Yes, he's great. I love there's a different level of sensitivity. That. We didn't necessarily. See from him in Basterds. My favorite performance. Is Calvin Candie. Leonardo DiCaprio, my favorite character. My favorite character, I should say. Just the oh my God, he's such a monster. Honestly, I do think the Academy kind of knew they messed up with bastards. And I think they. Overcorrected. A little bit in. Awarding. Django Unchained. Its Oscars. Like. I actually think Leo would. Have been a better supporting actor nomination here and. To bump up Christoph Waltz to. Actor, he probably he's. Not going to beat Daniel Day-Lewis, who won. His third Oscar for. Lincoln. But that's okay, because the dude won. Two, three years earlier for Basterds. Like he doesn't need two. In a row. And then if we moved Waltz to. A starring part and. Maybe Philip Seymour Hoffman wins the Oscar. For The Master, which. She she should. Won that year. But anyway. Second Q you really did think he should have won and was going to win. The screenplay for Basterds. And I agree. But Mark. Boal won. For his Hurt Locker script. And then in 2012, Quentin Tarantino is up. Against Mark Boal. Again. Who wrote the screenplay for Zero Dark 30. And I just would love to switch there. I wouldn't have minded. Tarantino winning for Basterds and then. Boal wins. For Zero Dark 30. But, you. Know, yes, it's the Oscars. So what are. We going to do? It's all I'm Tarantino has two Oscars. At any rate, he should have more. Can you tell the story of what you said to him? Yeah. Because you have a good impression of. Oh, so he so. Tarantino was surprised. That he lost in 2009, I'll put it that way. He knew he wasn't going to. Win director picture, but he was surprised that he lost screenplay. And he's like Mark Boal. Like The Hurt Locker. Okay, like. I get it. I mean, I get it. And when 2012 is coming. Around. It's you know. They're they're going head. To head again. It's Tarantino for Django Unchained, Mark Boal for Zero Dark 30. And Tarantino kind of found him. Before the ceremony. Began. Found him, I don't know. And he. Went right up to. Mark Boal. And he's like, this is you, me, mother fucker, because there's no one else. Nobody better fucking beat me, I swear to God. And you know, and he was I get all these. Stories from Tarantino's. Podcast, like, you guys got to be, listen to this shit. It's it's incredible. He's just dropping. Gold all the time. And yeah, I love that. I love that. Favorite needle drop. Lot of good songs. A lot of good songs. 100%. You already brought it up a little bit. It's when the KKK is on the horses and they're doing that sweeping, like epic classical piece. This needle drop has been used. It's so many epics. Or promos or commercials or. Anything and. He's it's. That is straight. Oh, Marge, I just oh, god. I love it. It's a really. Cool scene when you see, like, all of them coming in, like, it's. Just fun. It's really cool. And they can't. See. They can't see. They have that little argument. My favorite is Who. Did that to you? By John Legend, which is. Yeah. Oh, my God. It begins right when the dynamite explodes and. Continues as he rides fucking bear back. To save his woman. I love it, John Legend to scream it out. And then we get. That great look from the. Guy Django's. Just freed, you know, he. Goes, throw me up that dynamite. Yeah. And the guy, all those dudes have been doubting this Django do and you see him and he just smiles and nods. Off and appreciation. Pure cinema, baby. Pure cinema. I'll go first. My favorite scene or set piece. It's the dinner at Candyland, which runs about. 22 minutes. It's all like sitting down and then Samuel Jackson kind of, you know, he's you get to see that he's played a little bit. Of a character out. In public. Yeah, in the library. Sipping his cognac. He's, you know, down on the fucker who he says he is and he's just getting. Real, real. Down to it. And then convincing Calvin Candie about this candy coming out card with the skull. It's like it's. Another Tarantino. Dialog set piece. But then again, going back to D'Artagnan, it's death. Like very tough scene, but very necessary because that really is what changes. SCHULTZ It's like that's when in that moment he realizes his life is not more important than Candy's. He knows. This world. Will be a better place if Calvin Candie is not in it, even if that means he has to sacrifice himself as well. Wow. Great shit. Great shit. Yeah. Favorite set piece. I can't argue with any of that, but I just wanted to send some love to one scene that it was my favorite scene of Jamie Foxx's in the whole entire movie. You know, when looking for revenge in movies, you want to feel like you've gotten it. And this was a moment where it's when he kills that brutal brute. Yes. And by God that music and music cues. From. Django, by the way, you know, when it's. Like that under shot. Of Jamie Foxx. I mean, from the original. Django. When he knows that they're there and he walks up and he calls out his name, the level of power in his suit commands his attention with that suit. And then he's like, you know, it's like, I like the way you, boy. Yeah, but then Christoph Waltz comes like. I didn't get afraid. He jumps off and he goes, Who are they going? Oh, yeah, yeah, exactly. The whole therapy. They've tried to kill. And then the. Whole. Interaction of like. Are you. Positive? Yeah. Are you part I don't know what. Time is like. Are you sure. That's not positive. That's what. Boom. It just nails them right off. Yes. Yeah that's a great, great. That leads me perfectly. To my influences because if you haven't seen Django from 1966, it's like just go check it out. It was it was widely hailed as one of the most violent. Movies ever made of. Its time. You want to know where Tarantino got the inspiration to. Hack a cop's ear off? Go watch Django. You. What happens here? They cut it off. That show being cut off, and then they shove the ear in the guy's mouth. This movie is May 1966. Everyone flipping out. Over Reservoir Dogs. And let's say it's that gross. In Reservoir Dogs when. He talks into it and you hear just a slap. On the ground, it's gross, trust me. But. You know, Django is a lot fun, though. I watched last night. It's just it's a lot of the music, a lot of the same musical cues. And then, of course, Django. Unchained is just it's influenced by all the spaghetti. Westerns that Tarantino was raised. On and loves. By Sergio. Leone. So many more. All right. We've been talking for 4 hours. Well, almost. We're getting there. The Hateful Eight 2015. First thoughts. Mary. American first and. Only Oscar win. Amen review. Done. What else matters? No, I. Mean, I think I do have. A little back story for like. How we got The Hateful Eight. I think. Tarantino was furious. Leading up to making of this movie. I think that's why the movie plays, why it does play, because. Tarantino is a writer. First, he writes his scripts. Longhand and he considers himself a. Poet. Fair enough. The hateful eight script. Do you remember this? It leaked online in. January 2014. A few months. Before. Pre-Production began. Kuti was furious. He went to the press. He used names of the people he had sent the script to and basically said, I know my actors did not leak this, but. Someone from their. Team did, and I'm not making this movie. And people are devastated because it's like, Oh God, it's like the clock has. To start over. Like. Is he going? He's going to start writing something else. But then, you know, he holds a live read of it. Some of the actors come up, people convince him to make it. And then I think in a somewhat, you know, retaliatory fashion, Tarantino's like, okay, if you want me to make this leaked script, I'm going to make the most challenging movie of. My career because. The Hateful Eight is the longest film Quentin Tarantino has made. It contains the fewest amount of locations since. His first film. It does not have a lot of actors. It does not really have any action or violence. Until late in the movie. Of course, it's a patient piece, but when I watch it now. I see a director really trying to. Flex all the command and control. He has over the art form. So, yeah, I love it. Let's talk about Hateful Eight. I absolutely love this movie. I remember at this point when I, I honestly wasn't that impressed with Quentin Tarantino for like the last couple movies out because we didn't talk about with the Bastards, but based on a experience, I didn't have the best relationship to that movie, which is what happens sometimes. Sometimes you end up seeing a movie when you're not really in the best state, and it's unfortunate, but then the movie kind of doesn't land the way it actually does. Yeah, and we could be. Walking around for ten years going. Oh, that movie. Wasn't really for. Me. We don't remember that. Like, I don't know, we learned. Some piece of fucking. Horrific news right before we. Walked into the theater or whatever it is. Like, This can't happen, this does happen. And then that's why when when you explained to me that that was kind of. Where your bastards. Holed up was, I went, Hey, fair enough. I have. That for a few. Movies too. You just got to go back, watch it now because the movie's. There and you're. Yeah, that life experience you had that's back there in 2009. But we're here now and the. Movie's the same. So yeah, check it out. But I totally give you saying totally. Yep. And then when you look back in time goes by, the work speaks for itself. Mm hmm. When I saw Django Unchained for the first time because I only seen it one time and then the other time before we did this podcast. So I was behind on that. I saw it at a midnight showing, and I don't know about anyone else. I fall asleep at midnight shows. I cannot I, I didn't fall asleep. I don't I don't do two. Hour, 40 minute long. Movies at midnight. No, it was just a it was a challenging movie to kind of sit through at that time. And I remember walking out of it and I was just sort of like I had a little bit of a strange experience. So the last two Quentin Tarantino movies I was feeling at that time in 2015, a little like, I don't know anymore. Mm hmm. Then we get The Hateful Eight, and I enjoyed minute of this three hour plus overture included in it Ennio Morricone, a score writing performance. I absolutely had the best time with that movie. And then for this podcast, I, I watched the extended Netflix where they break up into chapters. Quinn Tarantino would do so well if he made material in this long format storytelling that we have these days, like TV and and miniseries. Now, this is the way people enjoy their content. I think they would have zero problem watching ten episode Quentin Tarantino if they were one hour apiece, as opposed to a two hour, 45 minute, three hour Tarantino movie that he gives you. This is. The paradox of our time as it relates. To movies and their yeah, this is something I talk about all the time. People can watch. 10 hours of something. I can't get them to watch a two. Hour 40. Five minute movie. Yeah. I don't know if if he got the rights to be able to redo Kill Bill in a certain way, I wonder if it would do better publicly if he broke it up like how he did with the hateful eight his make it into four one hour episodes and see where that goes. And I, of course binged this Hateful Eight series like back to back like I think I did two episodes in a row and then two episodes in a row. It's a lot of fun to watch it that way. Yeah. It was a lot of fun. Thought it was a great way that they edited it. I loved every character. I mean, because I come from theater, this it just, it, it felt like a play, but it it was a at no point was a board. So you. So I never I. Never bored, never. Stale, never not even in the opening stage. Go I. I fucking love that because I this. Is probably the. One you and I have talked about the least for whatever reason, because you and I had like just met. Yeah, it came out but I don't. Yeah, this would have been. I'm not. Either. I'm not bored either. I don't get bored in Tarantino. Movies, but that was some of the. Biggest criticism it received. And it didn't really do well in terms of. Oscar nominations, which I think surprised him. But I didn't know you had such fond appreciation for it. It really is like it's just such a big flex, like all of it. And honestly, man kind of breaking it up into chapters like that. It helps a story of this size because you're like, Oh, so this first. Chapter, this whole chapter one. I'm not leaving the stagecoach. Okay, I get it. Cool. That's cool. Now I. Know we're the now. We're on. To this place. It really works. And there's not. Like, too many differences between. The Blu ray. I own and that it's a little. Longer, different shot. Choices, but It's just a lot of fun, too. Like, you know, he's been. Maybe flirting with doing that for. Once upon a time in Hollywood. I would love that. We all would. So we'll see. But yeah, Hateful Eight card, it's just it's so cool to see him go. We're seeing him tap into a completely different side of his. Inspirations. Like that he loves. He's a big reader. So like the mystery novel Agatha Christie aspect of. It is really cool. Yeah, the thrill that came over me when we're in the middle of the movie and all of a sudden it breaks out into Quentin Tarantino's voiceover. Fuck man, you're literally Brett, your. Abs. Go for it. It's my favorite. Scene. It's my favorite. Scene in sequence of the movie. It's chapter four. Daisy Domergue, who's got a secret. Because that that that might be my. Favorite acting he's ever done in any. Of his movies because that. I agree is. The voiceover doesn't. Any so you get a ride he doesn't have any of that it's so clear. I mean wherever whatever you were thinking about the movie up until this point, once we get to a mystery component, that is when it just it sets in, you're like. Because now now he is including us. He's literally talking to us. Yeah, doubling that, doubling back, involving the audience. It's so cool. Now we're a part of the mystery playing out. It's like. From Tarantino's to that first gush. Of blood that's a. Very fun. Intense 9 minutes. My favorite sequence in the movie. Oh, and. The way he says it, somebody poisoned. The coffee. And when I was the first time I watched it, I didn't know that I was like, Is that him? Wait a minute, is it? And I really had to. Be like, Oh, yeah, it is. Oh, it's so cool. Do you want to do your favorite scene or set. Piece since I just said mine? Okay, it's a long sequence, but it's when Samuel Jackson has the three other guys with their arms against the wall. It's slow and he's he down. And he starts doing the whole entire thing that every murder mystery does where they start unraveling the whole thing. I, I love watching him do that. And Walton Goggins the whole entire time is just like repeating like a bird. Sometimes you fucking hate it so much like you, hates James. He's like, it was this sumbitch right here. All right. We're going to keep piggybacking this. My favorite character is Chris Mannix, sheriff. Chris Mix, Walt Gowdy. Yeah. You go with Goggins? Yeah. He's my favorite character. He's so keyed up. Like like I. Said, Fred. You got me at a bit of a disadvantage. Sure. I love it. My favorite my favorite line. Reading for him is. What he's about to get the stagecoach. And he goes, Well, Mr. Face, I was read to read right. I've loved him since The Shield. Christ, he was so good in that show and. This is right up there with his best work in film. And there's. There's a lot of acting legends in The Hateful Eight, Samuel L. Jackson, Kurt Russell, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Bruce Dern. Michael fucking Madsen. And Goggins more than holds his own. I love. Him character. And I got to say, shout out to Channing Tatum. Yeah, he's great. Did a great. Job. Yeah, he did a great job for that. Like he was perfectly cast, that type of role that he played. And I love Tim Roth. I thought like that whole entire opening where we get to him and he's like, Yes, of course. Because of course the accent changes. Yeah, yeah, the accent changes. But if I got to go with a favorite, I got to go with my boy. Kurt, of course. Kurt Volker, you're so good in it. I mean, a lot has been made that that, like, guitar. Was like a priceless heirloom from a. Museum. Oh, yeah. Literally beyond. Redeemable. Value. They couldn't. Even put a price on. It when they had to pay them back because it was, like. Uninsurable. So they. Yeah, I mean, he made a mistake. He didn't. He thought they'd swapped it out and he had the faulty guitar. But if you go back and watch that scene, watch Jennifer. Jason Leigh. Jason Leigh. Whoa, whoa. Which isn't really a period appropriate word. And she looks off camera. She's clearly like looking at it, you know, like, whoa, whoa, whoa, what are we doing? It's great. It's great. I can only imagine the guilt that Kurt Russell must have felt. He must've been like, Yeah. Oh, well. Apparently. You kind of ruined that. Day's shoot. And they, like, didn't know what they didn't. Know if they were going to be. In, like, a. Lot of trouble in the. Museum. I think we're not pleased they don't lend their stuff out for movie shoots anymore. That's I mean, you know. Yeah, yeah. We are for you, the museum. So why not? Well, Kurt fucking Russell. Yes. Smithereens. When we told him not to. Favor needle drop. It's a. Little. It's a little hard here. Because it's mostly just score but I actually love I got one I do too I have the. The very first song the first song on the Oscar winning score by Marconi. It's called Last. Stage Door, Red Rock. And just stirring those really slow drums, boom. Boom, boom. And just the opening credits. I love that piece of music. I think it sets the scene. So we're really. Holding on that just that opening shot for so long I love that was yours pulls. On my particular early favorites I love the White Stripes yeah so they got the apple blossom and the way that Jennifer Jason Leigh is like smile she just got punched in the face and like, that song is just going over it. There's just such a it lends itself to just I feel like that song was just uses character, right? Because It was like it expressed something that we needed to know about her is just being a fucked up, crazy person. And with that song in the background was like, That's great. That's fucking great. Oh, so good. All right, some hateful eight influences. Stagecoach by. John Ford, obviously. Key. Largo. Great movie from John Huston. About a bunch of people contained a small space. Murder on the Orient Express. A lot of the Western shows that he referenced in Hollywood. Most thrillingly to me, I never put this together before. The thing, John. Carpenter's the. Thing. Yeah. What he said was his biggest influence on it. He's like, Yeah, you have this unseeing thing killing people one at a time. We're all in a closed space. No, Kurt Russell and I went, duh. Like, I. Just never put. That together. Yeah, seriously? So. Well, like, it's just. It's really, really cool. The only issue I had with it is that there's more than eight people. Well, yes, James Parks. It's Michael Parks. As soon as Obie, he's in there. He's not a hateful person. So he doesn't get counted. As part of the Hateful. Eight. Oh, yeah. So it's just hateful. It's a spoiler. Yes. As the title suggests, it's just now you can make an argument to maybe like Channing Tatum showing up, but he's. Later he's not one of the four. Plus it's out The Hateful Eight. You know they put the eight in the title. For hate. Because he said, you know, it's all, you know, Magnificent Seven. And this is the eight movie. It's all it's all connected. It's all connected. All right. That's fine. James Parks is not. A hateful person. He's not one of the Hateful Eight. He's just a poor bastard along for the ride. They make him do all his shitty work. I know. I know. I love it. He comes back and it puts them like. The bear for over him. It sits in front of the fire is like. God, coach, it is. I never doing that again. Well we can talk about next Alex. He did it. This really feels like the film. Quentin Tarantino was born to. Make, the film he always wanted to make, but he needed eight. Feature films to learn. After The Hateful Eight. Kutty took four years. To develop. And create. This. Modern masterpiece. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. I was so excited. For this. Movie, a level of excitement that is. Frankly. Dangerous, because how can a movie. Ever live up. To that? If you go in with. The bar set. So impossibly high, it could indeed not be possible for a movie, any movie to reach that. I tried to manage. Expectations, but it was tough. In the summer of 2019, sitting down to this screening. And what a rare thing it. Is to walk into a movie with impossible expectations. And then the movie sets a fucking flamethrower. To him and burns way. Way past what you were expecting this to be. I love every single thing about this movie. I love its characters story simple day narrative structure. The Spawn Ranch scene. Feels like something out of Texas Chainsaw. Massacre, which it was modeled after the. Wind, the stillness, the camera movements. The first time you're watching it, it. Really plays that way. I no clue what's about to happen to Cliff Booth and in the finale, holy god, that. Is just. It's just from start to bottom. The exact movie Quentin Tarantino always wanted to make. There are any number of things we could. Talk about here. When I was talking to my dad, he said this was. His favorite Tarantino. Movie. Thanks largely to the radio. And the soundtrack, just always being the best and always connecting scenes, always connecting. Characters. When we all only had like, you know, a couple music options. To choose from. That's what you had on. It's just it's so cool. Hollywood his way that he uses like connects scenes to music in the way that he plays with fantasy and history and the fun that he has while he does it I think at 100% right. I think like he had been working his entire career to be able to execute on this level creatively. Inglourious Basterds might be superior on a certain type of level, but what he's set out to do with this, I think it's just executed better than ever, executed any type of filmmaking that he's done before. Yeah, I agree. This is a movie we've talked about a lot on the podcast because this podcast. We started it like. When was in its. Oscar run favorite character. Can I guess is it Cliff Booth played by. Oscar winner Brad Pitt? How could it not be that as mine as well. It big girl 57 the epitome of night to night. Why not. Favorite needle drop. Almost impossible for this passerby. I kind of went a little obscure. Hear me out here. It's not even on the soundtrack. It's basically every song that plays when. Cliff is driving home. When he's driving home from Rick's house. All the way back. But specifically when we cut to him on Hollywood. Boulevard and Jo Crocker's, the letter. Is just. Blaring away. And we see Cliff like changing. Gears on. Hollywood. He's tear an ass. There's neon going by he's weaving between slow. Cars. That's my. Favorite four. Of the whole movie. I don't know. I just I love that drive home so much. I love all the driving in it. But yeah. So she's. All right. I'm doing. I had the exact same thing, the exact same shit, but I just had a different piece of the music in that sequence. Which one? Bob Seger's Ramblin Gamblin Man. Oh, God. That was just at a particular place in time in my life where I felt like that. I was like, Man, I am. I am on my own right now. I am. I'm tearing life. I love that. So yeah, so. It's a little. Bit of a cheat, but a fuck it is our podcast. Right? Exactly. And then. Like favorite scene. Set piece. I mean, I mention the Spahn Ranch thing because. One of his favorite movies ever is the original. Texas Chainsaw. Massacre. And I went and watched when. That poor girl is. Shown up to the house and Leatherface. You know, grabs her, takes. Her in the back in the hole, like staging of. That of her walking up. To the house. To him walking up to George's house. It's all. Very similar. And they're just like. Dogs and like shady dudes in the background. There's all this stuff. There's all this stuff I know. Well, okay. So my favorite I don't know, favorite scene I just got. To it's really any driving. Scene, but I'll go with the home invasion ending. I mean, I don't know. How can I deny? Yeah. When that motherfucker walked out with that. Flamethrower and that. Music kicked up. Every screening. I saw. That people were just. Losing their minds. Seeing this with you in. Tarantino O's theater on your. Birthday in 2019 was just so, so cool. Like it was the best and people losing. Their minds. In there. That was the best screening I had for this movie because I laugh at like, just like different stuff. And the whole. Crowded there was. With me, like, everybody's laughing. Hysterically. Like, just the throwaway lines. Throwaway and quotes I put up so good. Yeah, I agree. That's that's my favorite scene of the movie. And that's, that's one of those scenes where I'll never forget I've seen that movie. So many times, and I love that scene for all of the pleasure and fun that it gives. But that first time, you don't know what's going to happen. Right? So when everything happens the way it does, it's that was just one of the best moments of ever had in the theater of all time. And it was also opening night weekend and none of the shit canning that the movie got was out yet. Yeah, that always takes like a week or two that Canning saw this movie. It was just it. Was very, very misguided. I'll just say that here. It was weird when it was happening. But what Margot Robbie does is Sharon Tate in this movie is a thing of absolute. Wonder, and she deserves her flowers and she respect for what she did. Whatever the hell people thought this was supposed to be. You're not the writer director, folks. That's all I'm saying. And all of a sudden, as I saw this movie, like every weekend for that whole entire summer and that opening two nights that I went, the audience had the best time with. That final scene. Then, lo and behold, a week later it gets a bunch of flack, and now the audiences are choosing for those those weekends to stay a little quiet during that scene. They didn't want to have fun with it because they knew they knew something and they weren't. Oh, you're talking. About that. Controversy. You're talking about the the violence of the end. The violence. It's all about the martyr. Well, there said to the movie get. Shaken for a lot of the Margot Robbie stuff. I was. Tiptoeing around. Yo come at me about the violence at the end come at me. I don't mind because I have an infallible argument. Can sitter the. Realistic alternative I'm not going to go into. It here. Sharon Tate was eight and a half months pregnant. It was bad. It was it was bad that killed. That murder, that gruesome murder. They all did. Is that what you all were hoping you would get to see? Is that what you wanted to see? A pregnant woman have her baby carved out of her? It's not what I wanted to see the movie Once Upon a time. Jesus fucking it. We're going to talk about of the thing before we close out this. I want to see if you've ever thought about this, mister. I've seen it so many times. Bruce Lee now, huh? Cliff Booth fighting a lot of people standing around, a lot of people watching. Bruce, you shouldn't fight that guy. Why? It got killed. His wife got away with it. That guy, as soon. As he throws Bruce Lee into the car. It cuts. All those people are gone. Oh, they're gone. So did that actually happen? Did that fight actually happen. Or did. He just do a little bit of a cheap move and. Throw Bruce Lee. Into the car, which I did think happened. And that's what pissed off Zoe. Bell, Kurt Russell. Because that fight scene, it's. Very interesting. That like it just kind of goes into the rely. Unreliable narrator aspect. Of it because this is Cliff Booth's memory is he building himself up to have a little. Bit more of a heightened memory like. Yeah, I kicked this kung fu master's ass? Did you. Or. Is it just I just want people to go back and rewatch scene. It's an injury. It's not a continuity error. It's not because it takes a lot of work. To clear all those actors from said, all right everyone clear out. Clear out. It's just going be Brad. It's going to be Brad. Mike, though. Come on, clear out. And then they got to clear out and do the scene. So go back in. This movie is not. Just surface level. There's a lot more going on here. And I just wanted. To get your interpretation of that. That's an interesting perspective I never thought about. I don't think Cliff Booth is the type of person that would second guess a lot of things, like in terms of having like a faulty memory about something. I think he's pretty honest with. What we. All I know, but we all remember ourselves. It's slightly heightened aspect. I just think I just. Think it's a really, really. Interesting thing, that's all that I did not notice, like the first few times I watched the movie. Yeah. Now I go back and I'm like, Hmm. That's really interesting. Like, there's no one around. I don't know. No, it's very interesting. I'll have to rewatch it again and wait for that moment to happen and see what I'm thinking. Challenge accepted. Okay. Yeah. Hollywood influences. I had a lot of fun when COVID hit. I owned once Upon a Time in Hollywood, and when COVID hit, I went, I'm going to watch. Every single. Movie that this movie references. And that's what I did like as much. CC In. Companies like Joe. Davis, The. Wrecking Crew three and. The Addict. Great Escape, Easy Rider. I had. Seen those Bob. And Carol and Ted. And Alice. Really fun. Movie. That was a big. Inspiration. But you don't. I mean, there's so much influenced. I mean, all the TV shows. She's right. Oh, my God. It's it's an encyclopedia. Goddamn magic. Pure filmography. Done. We did it for Slater. Holy shit. Three and a half hours later. Oh, by God, we're going for it. All right, we're going to move. We're going to keep moving. We're doing some fun. For the Oscar section here. Usually we'd go through as we went for each movie and talk about should it won that award, should it not have won that award? We're going to do some little different. We broke out the major categories. And we made our own. Nominations. We're going to read off our own. Nominations for the. Eight major categories, and then we are. Going to independently. Pick a winner. There is one rule here. And that is if the film. Or performance. Was nominated, we had to include the nomination. So like. Our best picture, if we were just. Making Quentin Tarantino Best Picture nominees, it may be a little different. But because four of his. Movies have been nominated, we had to include those. Hopefully those rules are clear. Are you ready to get into it? The cute. Oscars. Okay. Okay. All right. I got you. Okay. Well, Star within Easy Won Best Adapted. Screenplay winner Jackie Brown. Boom, boom. We're done. We're moving right along. He's only done one adapted. Screenplay, original screenplay. This is tough. He's had four nominations. Two wins Once Upon a time in Hollywood, Django Unchained, which. He won for Inglourious Basterds. Pulp Fiction, which he won. For. And we are nominating Reservoir Dogs. Those are our nominees. Five nominees. Who were you. What film are you awarding? Best Original Screenplay. Pulp Fiction. Pulp Fiction. Goddamn right. It has to be out. It has to be. I love to see it. All right. We're on a good track here. If it wasn't, I'd actually go with Inglourious Basterds. Oh, really? For screenplay. Screenplay? I didn't realize. Okay. My. My number two. Pick would be Hollywood. Yeah, for screenplay. But Oscar voters don't. Get to picks Nicolas. I know. Okay, moving on. Best cinematography also. Had four nominees. Actual nominees he had Once Upon a time in Hollywood, Django Unchained. Inglourious Basterds, The. Hateful Eight. And we have nominated Kill Bill. We're just including both because we want to. So both Kill Bill. So of those five nominees, what are you picking for best cinematography? Once upon a time in Hollywood. So am I. Oh, boy. Yeah. Two for two. Best editing, tough one. What we're talking about Tarantino. He said Emmy nominees here. I know best editing. Pulp Fiction, Inglourious Basterds. Once upon a time in Hollywood, he actually received nominations for those we added. Reservoir Dogs. And Jackie oh what are you. Awarding. Best editing. This is this is really hard. It is the the whole end of Jackie Brown alone is like is award winning. I'm going with Pulp Fiction. Jesus Christ. So mine. We're doing it. Yeah, it has to be. We didn't talk about this at all. This is great. All right. Best supporting actress. This is we've only had two official nominees, so we nominated three others. Our nominees are Uma Thurman. Pulp Fiction. Jennifer, Jason. Leigh, The Hateful Eight. We have included. Margot Robbie. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Bridget Fonda, Jackie Brown and Diane. Kruger for Inglourious Bastards. Who are you giving this award to? For me, this is a no brainer. This is Jennifer, Jason Leigh, all the way for The Hateful Eight. Really awesome. That's our first ever excited Uma. I love you. Owe me a mia Wallace. Okay, cool. So that's cool. You are. Jennifer Jason. Leigh and that is. Her only Oscar. Nomination. I will say she actually got. Nominated for it and that's all. Yep, yep. This is the hardest one. This is. Damn near. Impossible. Best Supporting Actor. This is. Ridiculous. I mean, I only had room two. We only had. Room to. Include one new nominee here because he's actually has had five total. We can only include four. Okay. Samuel Jackson. Pulp Fiction. Robert Forster, Jackie Brown. Christoph Waltz has been nominated and won. Twice for Bastards and Django. Unchained. We are only. Including his Basterds nomination. Here because an actor. Can be only nominated in the same award once in any given. Year. Their Brad Pitt. Once Upon a time in Hollywood and we included Leonardo. DiCaprio. Django Unchained. So once. More, here are. The what are you watching? Nominees for Quentin Tarantino, best supporting actor. Samuel Jackson. Pulp Fiction. Robert Forster. Jackie Brown. Christoph Waltz. Inglourious Basterds. Brad Pitt. Hollywood. DiCaprio. Django. What do you pick? Got to commit to just because this is an impossible, impossible category, I'm going with my heart. Brad Pitt, Cliff Booth, you are my hero. Once upon a time in Hollywood. It's between for me. That and Samuel Jackson. I'm just going to give it to Samuel. I think he should have won that damn Oscar. And I mean. Robert Forster. Christoph Waltz in either movie. DiCaprio, Django, they're all so good. Christoph Waltz Jesus DiCaprio I mean, God damn it. Tarantino's written a. Lot of amazing female. Characters, just. Not a lot of lead acting female characters. So we did our best here. I want to say this is the only. Is the only major award. That no film. Of Tarantino has ever been nominated for, which is a bummer. Uma Thurman for Kill Bill. Pam Grier for Jackie Brown. Zoe. Bell for Death Proof. Mélanie Laurent. For Inglourious Basterds. And I added Sidney Poitier as Jungle Julia in Death Proof, because I just thought it'd be fun. But what are you going with there? You know what's funny is that if you would have included Mélanie Laurent in supporting actress, that would have gotten my that would have gotten my pick. Well, we had time and we talked about this for the past week and you told me you had no changes. So thank. You for adding. That change. Now, Jesus. That all being said, going to go with Uma Thurman for Kill Bill just because between those two movies, the work and effort that she put in and the what we finally get on screen, you've earned it. Damn right. Well said. Well said. I'm going with. Pamela Greer, Jackie Brown, one of my favorite all time performances. Just, you know, in film. Oh, boy. We're getting down to it. Best actor. We have two nominations, two legit ones. John Travolta for Pulp Fiction. Leonardo DiCaprio for. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. We added Samuel L. Jackson, Jackie. Brown, Harvey. Keitel. Reservoir Dogs and Brad. Pitt. Inglourious Basterds. What are you going with? I'd settle for who can. Have three or four today if. If, fuck it. DiCaprio. Rick Dalton. Wow. Let's go. Okay. Vincent Vega for me. Baby, it's all. The way. Yeah, that would be between those two. But I also felt a burning desire to be Harvey Keitel. But it's between Travolta. DiCaprio. I'm going to go with DiCaprio because my heart. I love it. I love it. Best director. He has three nominations. Inglourious Basterds. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Pulp Fiction. We added Jackie Brown and Kill Bill. And I thought that was fun to add those. It sure. Was. Because some people might go it maybe it should be Hateful eight, maybe it should be Django Unchained. I don't know. Like there's three in there. Inglourious Basterds. Hollywood Pulp Fiction, though, it's actually got nominated. For best director. We just thought it'd be fun to pick. One of our own. You out of kill Bill. I added Jackie Brown, but what are we going to award here? There's only one. And that's Pulp Fiction. Damn right it. Is. It's got to be. Hollywood is. Hollywood kind of close. But the. Direction. Of Pulp Fiction is just dark. I love it. Yeah. Drum roll. Best picture. Yes. For Django Unchained. Basterds. Once upon a time in Hollywood, Pulp Fiction. We added. Reservoir. Dogs because we want it to. What are you picking as the Quentin Tarantino best picture? Pulp Fiction. Really? Not Hollywood. Wow, that's awesome. No fucking way. I like I've always said that I think of all of his work. I think Pulp Fiction is the best movie that Quentin Tarantino has made. But once upon a time, it just happens to be my favorite. All right. Well, that was fun. Now we had one kind of made up Oscar. Which would be a relatively cool or if you think. About it, best soundtrack I did the nominees. Of Reservoir Dogs. Pulp Fiction. Jackie Brown, Kill. Bill Upon a Time in Hollywood. But I love the soundtrack to Django. I mean, you know. There's not a bad one. Yeah, there really isn't. There really isn't. But what are you going with? I'm really curious about. This best. Soundtrack. There is absolutely no question at all. Once upon a time in Hollywood that is just. Oh, it's so good. Mine's pulp. Yeah. I listened to that thing so many damn times. Like on the bus to school. I brush my teeth the once upon a time in Hollywood. C.C. Rider If I were moving along here, that was fun, though. There's a lot to do with this. You know, we've been we've been going this is a is a. Marathon right here. I wanted to as we get toward the end, do some cutesy by the numbers. I'm not going to lie. Most of. These were reserved for curse words, but but you seem to have covered that. Already a little bit. But okay, real quick as you can you guess, the Tarantino movie with the most F-bombs are Reservoir Dogs. It is Reservoir Dogs. Good job, two. Hundred and 60. Nine F-bombs in a. 100 minute. Movie. That's crazy. Pulp Fiction as to 65 that movies like more than double the length. That's wild. Euphemism for. Genitalia. Reservoir Dogs has. 19. That was something that popped out in my head. You know Goodfellas like you want over the bull Boston. Prick. Yeah. Runtimes shortest movie Reservoir Dogs at one hour, 39 minutes. Longest movie, The Hateful Eight at two. Hours and 48. Minutes. Second place is Django with two. Hours and 40. 5 minutes. Also want to point something out which movie is. Longer to. You? Which movie feels longer to you? Pulp Fiction or Jackie Brown? First time I saw Jackie Brown. Jackie Brown feels longer, but then the second time I watched Jackie Brown minute thing just cruise right by. Yeah well so I'm gonna go pulp because pulp always feels like how long it is. Pulp Fiction is. 2 hours and 34 minutes. Jackie Brown two. Hours and 34 minutes. Look at that. Wow, isn't that crazy? I am a junkie bastard. Oscars. We just kind of had. Fun with our Oscars. But then most nominations, Hollywood received, ten nominations. Basterds. Received eight most wins. Django has won two and Hollywood won two. Box office. The most expensive was. Django $400 million budget. And the biggest success was Django, which. Made 420. $5 million worldwide, followed by Hollywood, which. Made 374 good. Good. Numbers. Rotten Tomatoes like who gives a. Shit but Rotten Tomatoes. The highest is Pulp Fiction at 92%, the lowest this gets a. Little weird. Because they have. Death proof rate at. 65%. But then Grindhouse as a total has. 84%. But Planet. Terror. Is 76%. So those. Numbers just. Don't make sense. So or it could be the. Hateful eight at 70. 4%, whatever, whatever you want to. Go with. But this is that's all The Hateful Eight got is 74. That's why I hate Rotten Tomatoes. Yeah, that people didn't. That's why they set that movie up the way I did that he kind of did it his own way. All right. Fun by the numbers. We're getting. Close to the. End, folks, I promise. Drum roll. We're ranking Quentin. Tarantino. We have nine because we counted kill Bill is one. So there's nine movies. To get through here. We're going to. Go 9 to 1. You go, I'll go. You go. I'll go, Hugo. Oh, I'm going first. You don't have to if you don't want to cry, baby. No, I'll. It. I always do. I'm very much looking forward to this because based on our conversation, I know we are going. To have some these are not going to be the same. And I dig it. These are not going to be the same. Yes. If you can live up to your wackiest Paul Thomas Anderson rankings. Yeah, this might be of their card. I hope the. Fans remember that. One. All right. Number nine, Django Unchained. Nice. Okay. Okay. Number nine for me. I love all of these movies. I do not give any of these movies. A grade. Less than an A. There are no we should say that. There are. No B pluses is it's just. That something. Has to come on list. Yep. Something has to come. In last for me. Sorry to do. It to you. It's The Hateful Eight. No, I love. Wow. I love that movie number eight. So I'm linking them together. But I'm going with the Kill Bill, volume one and two. Okay. Just subtle. Differences. That's what we're going to have, like solutions. Number eight for. Me. Wow, this is going to be higher for you to death proof, not talking smack. All right. All right. I got to go there. All right. Number seven. Well, hey, that's my number seven. Okay. Okay Well, my number seven is Django. Which was your number nine. Okay. So we'll go on to. Your number. Six. Inglourious Basterds. We're close. We're close. My six is Kill Bill, which. Was your number eight. So number five. From you. Somehow. And that's top five here. Top five. Top five. Cut the hateful eight. Okay. Well, it crossed the seal into the top five. My number five is Inglourious Basterds, which just gets. A little better every time I watch it. I was surprised that cracked my top five. I love where this is going we have the same bottom four. It's the great. Yeah, yeah. It's just going to be the order. Yeah. Number four for you. Number four's Jackie Brown. Same here. Number four. Oh, yeah. Love to see. It. Number three, Reservoir Dogs. Oh, yes, you see it? Well, see, I love to see it. Number two, Pulp Fiction. Yeah, I figured you do that. Yeah. People who know know that my. Number two is. Going to be Hollywood number one, obviously, Pulp Fiction, but I figured that would be the way. For you. And number two for you, Pulp number. One, Hollywood. Awesome. Yep. And like I said, I think Pulp Fiction is the best movie Quentin Tarantino has made. But in these rankings of our favorites, I got to go with my favorite. And that, of course, is my second favorite movie of all time, which is awesome that both of our second favorite movies of all time are Quentin Tarantino. Yeah, yeah. Because mine's pulp. Absolutely. All right, we'll go through them. I'll do mine real quick. Nine Hateful Eight. Eight Death Proof Django Unchained. Six Kill Bill five. Inglourious Basterds. Four Jackie Brown. Three. Reservoir Dogs. Two. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood one. Pulp Fiction Go number nine, Django Unchained. Number eight, Kill Bill. Number seven, Death Proof Number six, Inglourious Basterds. Number five, The Hateful Eight. Number four, Jackie Brown, number three, Reservoir Dogs. Number two, Pulp Fiction, number one. Once upon a time in Hollywood. We did it well, just about. And that was a lot of fun. This is like the longest podcast. We've ever done, and I never once got bored or. Anything. It's crazy. We just spent the whole afternoon together talking about this. It's like, I'm going to finish up here with two quick things. Quentin Tarantino just released a book called Cinema Speculation. I read it in two days. It was amazing. Starts with some BIOS, stuff about him, but then it gets to. Each chapter is. A specific movie and you get like a little movie. History lesson before he. Talks about the movie and what he likes about it, what he doesn't like, talks. About Deliverance. Bullitt. The Getaway. Sisters. Taxi Driver, hard core. Oh, my God. It's just so good. I plan to talk about it. A little more, but now that we're at the part that we. Are at Cannes, always come back and talk about. It could be actually a fun kind of part to go. Through each chapter of the book and. Talk about what he says about the movie what I think what you think about the movies you've seen, I don't know. It could be fun, but cinema speculation cannot recommend it highly enough. This is what he's going. To do in. Retirement. Writing books. I'm here for it. I like it. Sour ending. What the hell is this final movie going to be? Not that we have any insight. I can tell you, I didn't do like a deep, deep, deep dove on this because he's talked about it a lot. I already shared. My kill bill. I love your thrill story. Getting totally talented. Or develop it together, work it out. But if we make it to 2025 that we will have matched his longest gap between films six years. It looks like we may get there. There's nothing coming out in 20. 23 and I. Don't know, we'll see. But I've heard him say. Right now he doesn't feel like he wants to try it. Out. Epic Once Upon a time in Hollywood because how can you out epic the of a man is. More I've heard him. Say use this exact line that he might want to treat his final film like the epilog of a novel to something a. Little simpler. Not like gentle, but just something, you know, just a little simpler. And we'll see if that's what he does. I'm here for whatever he does. I really wish the dude would just keep going and not end at ten. But he has. He's had this thing in his. Head for a. While. Like all of his film Heroes. They made it to a point. Where they weren't making. Good movies by the end, and he does not want to. Turn into that. I hear that. I get that. But it's also like I don't know, he just seems so concerned about being ten and done and it kind of sucks. But it also puts a lot of pressure on this last movie because if you are doing an epilog. Movie, you're going to. Some people are just going to be. Inherently. Let down. I'm not going to, but I can I can. Kind of hear that vibe already, but. I will. I really love the idea of Kill Bill. If you are a director and you are doing only ten movies and and these are the movies that we have to be able to get it trilogy in that that filmography is a really cool idea and it's only one that he could do. In a cool Epilog. It would be a very cool blog, but if that whole thing happened, but then the movie just turned into something completely different. So whatever he wants to say with his last movie, but maybe like base it in the Kill Bill world, but then do funky shit with it. Yeah. They take it into directions that, that, that he would want to go. So maybe it's like how would kill bill is it starts off as a kung fu movie turns into a western this starts off in one way but then goes into another. I like that idea a lot. Yeah. Like they have to fight their team together to fight zombies series and just. All my shirts. And like, turds. They do bad together. It turns into, like, this horror movie. But, you know, I honestly don't think he'll go back to. Kill Bill three. I think he'll want its own separate story. I'm just putting this out there. We all know how you watch Death Brew. If you watch Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, we know how. Much admiration. Was my second favorite. Theory. Yeah, we how much. Admiration Quint Tarantino. Has. For stunt. People. Who is the most famous stuntman working today? It's Tom Cruise who does all of his own stunts and he's a lunatic. He really considered Tom Cruise for one. Of the main parts in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. He would. Have had to work out. Who to place with him. But this could be something I don't know. It just could happen. Or to. Spitball it here. Like we've talked about. Where's Cruise's career going to go after the. Action thing? Mean he's doing half stuntman, half like. Older cruise. That shit could work and Quentin Tarantino likes Tom Cruise He appreciate Tim Quentin Tarantino loved Top Gun maverick he doesn't Tarantino often doesn't talk about a lot of new movies, but he love that. I don't know. It could be cool. I have no. Idea what the story is, anything like. That. But just that could be a. Very simple story. About like an old stuntman. Grizzled. I. Don't know, whatever it is that. Could get Cruise an Oscar nomination, I don't know. Putting it out there, some real stunts, just put it out there. It would be really cool to see Tom Cruise work when Quentin Tarantino's universe. Yeah. It doesn't have to be like. Overly verbose. Dialog. Cliff Booth is not overly verbose. It's all mood and tone and like keeping it in and Cruise can do that shit. So I don't know. We'll see. We did. Folks made it to the end. What are you watching? Recommendation. I'll go first here because I'm just going to be real quick because we've kept these people, these poor people, these dedicated fans here long enough. I want everyone I already mentioned it like 4 hours ago. Go watch Jackie Brown again. Go rewatch. It. Go watch for the first time. Is that yours? Yeah, that was my I was doubling down with Jackie Brown. That's so funny. That's fucking great. Oh, my God. Doubling down on Jackie Brown. Yes, because I still talk to people who love Tarantino. We have a very good friend. Who loves Tarantino. This is the only movie of his he hasn't seen. Go watch it. Chill, chill, cool, cool. If you seen it in a while, it's not going. To hurt to rewatch. It. Tell me why people. Should watch it for. You. They will get the hell out of here. For the same reason. Like it's the one movie that I feel like goes under the radar. It's the one that most people, when they see it, don't have a strong opinion about. But I think you just have to watch that movie differently than you watch every other. Quentin Tarantino movie. Yeah, you got to settle in a little bit more for it. But if you do, it delivers in a way that that that his movies don't usually like. It's just a very, very different it's the it's the outlier of everything and it's that good. All thanks to Michael Keaton is Ray Nicolet. We made oh, well, I didn't know this is going to go this long. It was just we're set. You're sitting here with us. This is what it's like to be. In a room. With Nick and I, talking about Tarantino. For 4 hours. We so appreciate. Everyone. Staying with us for this episode and all others. Let us know. Give us your. Tarantino rankings on Twitter or Instagram at. WFYI. W Underscore. Podcast. But as always, thank you for listening and happy watching. I said Got got. Hey everyone, thanks again for listening. You can watch my. Films and read my. Movie blog at Alex Withrow dot com. Nicholas Tor.com is where you can find all of Nick's film work. Send us mailbag questions at what. Are. You watching podcast at gmail.com or find us on Twitter at W AIW Underscore Podcast. Next time we're going to review. A bunch of fall 2022 movies, no spoilers titles The Banshees of a Nation, Armageddon Time, The Fable, Men's Bones and All Glass Online. It's going to be fun. Stay tuned.